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August 2018 Research Roundup

  • White striping and wooden breast muscle, two conditions affecting the quality of chicken breast meat, can be reduced by time-limited feeding, according to a study co-authored by John Barnes.  

The research, published in Poultry Science, also finds that genetic background and egg storage periods may influence the expression of both conditions.  

Read the study here.

  • A study co-authored by Korinn Saker and Laura Gaylord evaluates nutritional deficiency risks for dogs on weight loss plans.

The study in the Journal of Small Animal Practice finds several nutrients, including selenium and riboflavin, at risk of deficiency when certain non-therapeutic adult maintenance diets and weight management diets are used.

Read the study here.

  • Research co-authored by Tobias Kaeser backs up the theory that uterine epithelial cells in pigs have the capacity to act as sentinels for the detection of incoming pathogens.

Preserving a pathogen-free uterine environment is critical for healthy swine herds. The findings are published in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology.

Read the study here.

  • E. coli isolated from urinary tracts of dogs are frequently capable of forming biofilms, which can result in resistance to antimicrobial agents, according to research co-authored by Sara Lyle, Shelly Vaden, Jessica Gilbertie, Megan Jacob and Zachary Kern.

The study, which analyzes canine bacterial urinary tract infections common in companion animals, suggests potential for biofilm formation should be considered when an E. coli UTI is diagnosed. The Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published the research.

Read the study here.

  • Species of the bacteria Bartonella may play a primary role or factor into the development of feline endomyocarditis-left ventricular endocardial fibrosis, or FEMC-LVEF, according to a study co-authored by Ed Breitschwerdt.

The research, published in the Journal of Comparative Pathology, found Bartonella DNA in 50 percent of the studied feline hearts diagnosed with FEMC-LVEF. The findings support the idea that development of the disease in the Northeast United States may be influenced by Bartonella infection or co-infection with multiple Bartonella species.

Read the study here.

  • A study published in the Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care, finds that venous oxygenation accurately reflects systemic oxygenetic status and may be used to guide treatment and prognosis in critically ill patients.

Bernard Hansen and Rebecca Walton co-authored the research, which notes that measurement of venous oxygenation in veterinary patients is feasible and potentially valuable in the severe disease management.

Read the study here.

  • Lung ultrasounds and thoracic radiographs are both useful in the detection of alveolar-interstitial syndrome, or AIS, if the lungs of dogs and cats, according to research co-authored by Teresa DeFrancesco and published in the Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care.

Read the study here.

  • A survey into prescribing practices of veterinarians in treating chronic feline musculoskeletal pain finds a contrast between prescribed therapies and what’s supported by evidence-based literature.

The study, published in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery and co-authored by Duncan Lascelles and Derek Adrian, could inform future research of therapies and guide treatment of pain in cats.

Read the study here.

  • A study co-authored by Craig Harms, Emily Christiansen, Laura Ruterbories and Rita Hanel, establishes a protocol for thromboelastography, a way to test blood coagulation efficiency, for sea turtles.

The research, published in Veterinary Record Open, aids understanding of conditions such as cold-stunning that affect sea turtles. All species of sea turtles are threatened, vulnerable or endangered. Thromboelastography, or TEG, is widely used in mammals but has not previously been performed in reptiles.

Read the study here.

  • The intestinal mucosal environment of juvenile pigs can stimulate repair of injuries to the intestine of newborn piglets, according to a study published in PLOS One.

The research, with co-authors including Amanda Ziegler, Anthony Blikslager, Liara Gonzalez and Laurianne Van Landeghem, may guide future treatments and help refine the understanding of why many newborn species are unable to repair such injuries on their own.

Read the study here.