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Dorman Elected to one of the World’s Most Important Scientific Societies

David Dorman, professor of toxicology in the Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, has been elected as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), one of the world’s most important scientific societies and publisher of the journal Science.

AAAS elevates members to the rank of Fellow for their efforts toward advancing science applications that are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished. Dorman is being recognized for “distinguished contributions to the field of toxicology, particularly research investigating the nasal and neurotoxicity of environmental chemicals.”

“Dr. Dorman’s work in the field of toxicology has made outstanding contributions in areas including neurotoxicology, neonatal health, and environmental health,” says Dean Paul Lunn of the NC State College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM). “It has been especially intriguing to see his recent work on olfactory function and cognition in military working dogs, given their critical roles in bomb detection. This recognition for Dr. Dorman highlights the vital role veterinarians play in basic and translational science, and the contributions of our profession to society.”

Dorman’s research has addressed contemporary issues concerned with environmental and occupational hazards of exposure to a range of agents such as methanol, hydrogen sulfide, and Middle East sand dust. The toxicology professor is an internationally recognized authority in metal neurotoxicity, particularly for his studies on manganese. This work has helped serve to guide federal authorities, such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, in formulating risk assessment decisions on permissible levels of manganese in the atmosphere. Most recently he has investigated olfaction and cognition in dogs, especially dogs used for the detection of improvised explosive devices.

Dorman, a member of the Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, has also made substantial contributions through his service to the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences (NRC/NAS) and has served as a member of the National Toxicology Program Board of Scientific Counselors. He is a recipient of the Society of Toxicology’s Achievement Award, which is given to an early career individual, who has made significant contributions to toxicology.

Election as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science is an honor bestowed upon members by their peers. Fellows are recognized for meritorious efforts to advance science or its applications. Fellow nominations may be made by any three Fellows who are current AAAS members, so long as two of the three sponsors are not affiliated with the nominee’s institution.

Founded in 1848, the AAAS is the world’s largest scientific society with 261 affiliated societies and academies of science serving 10 million individuals. The AAAS began awarding the distinction of Fellow in 1874.