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Belinda Akpa, PhD

Assistant Professor of Integrated Synthetic and Systems Biology

Contact:

bsakpa@ncsu.edu
Office: 919.513.6426
Lab: Engineered Medical Responses Lab
Lab Phone: 919.513.6426

Belinda Akpa joined North Carolina State University in August 2015 as a Chancellor’s Faculty Excellence Program cluster hire in Synthetic and Systems Biology. As an Assistant Professor in the Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, Dr. Akpa’s research focuses on developing mathematical models to connect molecular events to dynamic physiological outcomes. She has a particular interest in using numerical simulations to bridge length-scales in integrated computational and experimental investigations - with the aim of accelerating the translation of molecular and cellular level findings to medical applications. Her current interests lie in the areas of cardiovascular systems pharmacology, molecular and systems toxicology, and viral kinetic modeling.

Dr. Akpa obtained her Bachelor’s degree, Master’s degree, and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering at the University of Cambridge, where she worked under the guidance of Lynn Gladden in the field of experimental magnetic resonance. She joined NC State after six years on the faculty in the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), where she initiated an interdisciplinary research program in computational biomedicine. There, she worked closely with physicians and biomedical scientists at the UIC College of Medicine and Jesse Brown VA Medical Center. She also mentored graduate and undergraduate research students with academic backgrounds ranging from chemical engineering and biology to pharmacy and astronomy.
Biological Barriers, Pharmacology
Computational Biomedicine: Our focus is on developing mathematical models to connect molecular events to dynamic physiological outcomes. Current areas of interest include cardiovascular systems pharmacology, molecular and systems toxicology, and viral kinetic modeling.

In all cases, the goal, broadly stated, is to use computational approaches to:

(1) Identify causal relationships between molecular phenomena and experimental observables

(2) Support data interpretation through modeling of mechanistic hypotheses

(3) Accelerate extrapolation of findings to develop applications

(4) Explore parameter spaces to facilitate experimental and minimization of resources

  • Enhanced 13C PFG-NMR for the study of dispersion in porous mediaAkpa B.S., Holland D.J., et al. | Journal of Magnetic Resonance 186:160-165 (2007)
  • Study of miscible and immiscible flow in a microfluidic device using magnetic resonance imagingAkpa B.S., Matthews S.M., et al. | Analytical Chemistry 79:6128-6134 (2007)
  • Non-invasive mass transfer measurements in complex biofilm-coated structuresGraf von der Schulenburg D.A., Akpa B.S., et al. | Biotechnology and Bioengineering 101(3):602-608 (2008)
  • Vesicle Formation and Endocytosis: Function, Machinery, Mechanisms, and ModelingParkar N.S., Akpa B.S., et al. | Antioxidants & Redox Signaling 11(6):1301-1312 (2009)
  • Validity of the lipid sink as a mechanism for reversal of local anesthetic systemic toxicity: A physiologically based pharmacokinetic studyKuo I and Akpa B.S. | Anesthesiology 118(6):1350-1361 (2013)
  • Resuscitation with lipid emulsion: dose-dependent recovery from cardiac pharmacotoxicity requires a cardiotonic effectFettiplace M.R., Akpa B.S., Ripper R., Zider B., Lang J., Rubinstein I., and Weinberg G.L. | Anesthesiology 120(4):915-925 (2014)
  • Multi-modal contributions to detoxification of acute pharmacotoxicity by a triglyceride micro-emulsionFettiplace M.R., Lis K., Ripper R., Kowal K., Pichurko A., Vitello D., Rubinstein I., Schwartz D., Akpa B.S., and Weinberg G.L. | Journal of Controlled Release 198:62-70 (2015)
  • Confusions about infusion: Rational volume guidelines for intravenous lipid emulsion during enteral toxicityFettiplace M.R., Akpa B.S., Rubinstein I., and Weinberg G.L. | Annals of Emergency Medicine 66(2):185-188 (2015)