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June 2018 Research Roundup

A look at some of the newest published studies coming out of the NC State College of Veterinary Medicine

  • A study co-authored by Luke Borst and Laura Edwards finds that mast cells exert anti-inflammatory properties in cases of chronic inflammatory bowel disease. The research, published in Mediators of Inflammation, offers new insight into the roles of mast cells in modifying inflammation during different stages of colitis.

Read the study here.

  • Developing an international registry of canine spinal cord injury observations may improve translational studies of the condition, according to a study co-authored by Natasha Olby and Natalia Zidan. A collaboration between multiple veterinary schools across the United States and Europe, the study, published in Spinal Cord, suggests that research in human spinal cord injury benefits from a canine clinical model informed by such a registry.

Read the study here.

  • The quality of recovery for horses undergoing short periods of general anesthesia may improve when they are induced with propofol and ketamine, compared to midazolam and ketamine. The study also suggests that the duration of action of the induction drugs and the total procedure time should be factors in choosing drugs for equine patients. Kate Bailey, Kristen Messenger, Timo Prange and Lysa Posner are among the co-authors of the study, published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association.

Read the study here.

  • A type of tick commonly seen in endangered lemurs may serve as a vector for a slew of pathogens, according to to a study co-authored by Barbara Qurollo. The research, published in Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases, evaluated data from the H. lemuris microbiome and found that it is home to DNA from several species of bacteria and parasites, including Rickettsia and Babesia, responsible for several infectious diseases found in animals and humans.

Read the study here.

  • Research from Amy Stieler Stewart, John Freund, Anthony Blikslager and Liara Gonzalez establishes a porcine model of segmental intestinal ischemia, showing a way to isolate and grow intestinal stem cells to aid study of post-injury epithelial repair. The work, published in the Journal of Visualized Experiments, could lead to breakthroughs in treating life-threatening intestinal ischemia, when the intestine’s blood supply, and therefore oxygen, is decreased because of disease.

Read the study here.

  • Several important antimicrobial resistances in invasive non-typhoidal salmonellosis are identified in a study co-authored by Cristina Lanzas and William LoveThe research, published in Epidemiology & Infection, tests pathogen resistance to several antimicrobials that play a critical role in treating iNTS and maps patterns of resistance in several subpopulations of NTS organisms.

Read the study here.

  • A look into how gait impacts bone strength in turkeys with leg defects found that while only crooked toes caused consistent differences in patterns and bone properties, gait kinetics are generally correlated with turkey bone biomechanics. The work was published in Poultry Science and co-authored by Duncan Lascelles.

Read the study here.