March 2018 Research Roundup

A look at some of the newest published studies coming out of the NC State College of Veterinary Medicine.

  • A study co-authored by Ed Breitschwerdt and Barbara Qurollo takes a close look at tick-borne diseases carried by Madagascar’s iconic lemurs. Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases published the molecular surveillance research, which highlights the prevalence of three blood-borne organisms in wild lemurs living in close proximity to domesticated animals and humans. Of emerging infectious diseases, about 75 percent are zoonotic and, of those, tick-borne organisms are increasing global health concerns.

Read the study here.

  • CVM researchers are part of a team that has uncovered the first reported mutation in dogs associated with the bone disease osteochondromatosis. Natasha Olby, Debra Tokarz, Kathryn Meurs and Oriana Yost are co-authors of the study, published in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, that identified the mutations in a litter of American Staffordshire terrier puppies.

Read the study here.

  • In a survey, canine epilepsy researchers at the CVM found that epilepsy management requires a substantial commitment from dog owners and that long-term veterinary support and successful control of seizures strongly influence owner and pet quality of life. The study, published in the Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association, also found that owners relied on emotional and educational support from veterinarians and online pet-owner groups for long-term management of the disease. Julie Nettifee, Karen Munana and Emily Griffith are co-authors.

Read the study here.

  • Serum interleukin 6 and chemokine ligand 2 have limited diagnostic capabilities to identify severe fibrosis or necroinflammatory activity in dogs with various liver diseases, according to a study published in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine and co-authored by John Cullen.

Read the study here.

  • Casey Theriot, assistant professor of infectious disease.

    Casey Theriot contributed to a special issue of the journal American Society of Microbiology highlight early-career system microbiology scientists. In the issue, Theriot discussed defining the function of the gut using approaches for rational design of personalized therapeutics.

Read the study here.

  • A new study from Brian Gilger outlines immune-relevant models for ocular inflammatory diseases, including dry eye and uveitis. The overview, published in the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research Journal, looks at the effectiveness and safety of new therapies to treat ocular conditions, as well as models that have translational applications for ocular diseases in humans.

Read the study here.

  • The Canine OsteoArthritis Staging Tool, or COAST, is a practical way to assess the impact of osteoarthritis on dogs, according to a study co-authored by Duncan LascellesThe study, published in the Veterinary Journal, found that COAST has the ability no asses at-risk pre-clinical dogs as well as those with established OA signs. COAST may help improve pain control and clinical management as well.

Read the study here.