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May 2018 Research Roundup

A look at some of the newest published studies coming out of the NC State College of Veterinary Medicine

  • A nine-member CVM team found that koi achieved measurable plasma propofol concentrations, resulting in general anesthesia, when exposed to propofol via immersion. The study, published in Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia, may have impact on treatment approaches for koi, a popular pet fish.

Read the study here.

  • With treatment, there is a good prognosis for long-term vision in cats with hypertensive chorioretinopathy, even after complete detachment of retinas, according to a new study. Veterinary Ophthalmology published the research, co-authored by Whitney Young, Michael Davidson and Hans Westermeyer.

Read the study here.

  • A new study co-authored by Freya Mowat explores clinical signs and treatment outcomes for dogs with uveodermatologic syndrome, an autoimmune condition that destroys healthy tissue. The research is published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association.

Read the study here.

  • For the first time, a study has shown that real-time polymerase chain reaction, or PCR, is an effective way to differentiate between a diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy and Marek’s disease in poultry. The study was led by Isabel Gimeno and published in Avian Pathology.

Read the study here.

  • Several important resistances to antimicrobials used to treat invasive non-typhoidal Salmonellosis are identified in a study co-authored by William Love and Cristina Lanzas. The research, published in Epidemiology & Infection, identifies instances of increased resistance to antimicrobials ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin and azithromycin.

Read the study here.

  • A study co-authored by Megan Burke and Anthony Blikslager is the first to show that a sleeve-style ice boot can greatly decrease lamellar temperatures in horses, aiding in recovery from sepsis-associated laminitis. The research is published in the Equine Veterinary Journal.

Read the study here.

  • Early rehabilitation for dogs after surgery for acute thoracolumbar intervertebral disc herniation is safe, but doesn’t improve the rate of level of recovery in dogs who still have feeling below the site of a spinal cord injury, according to a new study co-authored by a team of CVM researchers. The work, published in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, has co-authors including Natasha Olby, Julien Guevar and Karen Munana.

Read the study here.