Skip to main content
NC State CVM
Think and Do The Extraordinary
GIVE to the College
Think and Do The Extraordinary
The Campaign for NC State CVM

NC State University Terry Center Dermatology Service Identifies and Treats Skin and Ear Problems

The Dermatology Service in the Randall B. Terry, Jr. Companion Animal Veterinary Medical Center provides diagnostic and treatment expertise for referred companion animals with diseases of the skin and ears.  

Clinicians, certified by the American College of Veterinary Dermatology, evaluate patients for infections, external parasites, allergies, hormonal and auto-immune diseases and are able to perform specialized diagnostic procedures that include microscopic examination of the skin and hair, allergy testing, and video-otoscopic (ear) examinations.

The Terry Center Dermatology Service has three areas of special interest:

  • Ear Diseases – Terry Center clinicians assist veterinarians in the diagnosis and management of both acute and chronic otitis—inflammation of the external or internal ear regions.
  • Allergic Skin Diseases – clinicians specialize in the management of allergic diseases, especially atopic dermatitis and adverse food reactions. Clinicians have a special interest in the medical treatment and immune prevention of canine atopic dermatitis.
  • Autoimmune Skin Diseases – clinicians provide a unique expertise in the diagnosis and management of autoimmune skin diseases. The dermatology research laboratory supports clinicians with the access to advanced immunological tests not available elsewhere in other North American veterinary colleges.

Dr. Thierry Oivry Professor of Immunodermatology and head of the Dermatology Service is the lead author of the Practice Guidelines for Canine Atopic Dermatitis,” the open-source standard of care recommendations proposed by the International Task Force on Canine Atopic Dermatitis.

The peer-reviewed guidelines—a first for the specialty of veterinary dermatology— represent a consensus of evidence-based recommendations on how to treat dogs with canine atopic dermatitis. The guidelines took two years to develop, have been translated into more than 15 languages, and are provided free to veterinarians around the world.

Additional Information:

CVM Dermatology Research Indicates Flea/ Tick Product Causes Adverse Skin Reaction

CVM Dermatology Service Solves Dog’s Long-standing Mystery Skin Ailment