New to the CVM Family: Meet Jori Vasgaard

When the landmark NC State Think and Do the Extraordinary capital fundraising campaign was launched in 2017, one of the primary goals at the College of Veterinary Medicine was collaborating with the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences to build the Reedy Creek Equine Farm. It will provide updated teaching and reproductive services facilities that have been needed for some time. 

Reedy Creek is now a reality, and an equine farm needs a seasoned professional in charge. Say hello to Jori Vasgaard, the new farm’s new director.

 

What is your background?

Since graduating from CALS, I’ve had the opportunity to work with and learn from some of the leading breeders and trainers in the quarter horse industry, primarily in Texas and Oklahoma. I also have previous experience working at the CVM in the reproduction service, and I worked as the animal resource manager at the University of California, Davis. But it was always my goal to move back to North Carolina and work at the CVM.

How did you happen to get into this field?

When I was in high school in Boone, like many young girls I had a passion for horses. I was fortunate enough to find a mentor who was the first woman allowed into thoroughbred breeding sheds in Kentucky. She was amazing, and I wanted to have a career similar to hers. 

What will you be doing in your new job?

I will be overseeing the day-to-day operations of the Reedy Creek Equine Farm. The farm will not only make equine reproductive services more accessible to the Triangle, but add momentum to the college’s effort to update and enlarge existing equine services over the next few years. This is actually my dream job.

What’s something someone would be surprised to learn about you?

I have a passion for art, which to me is everything from music to fashion to architecture.

When you’re not on campus, where could we find you?

Probably hiking with my dogs or out dancing with friends.

Do you have any pets? 

I have a 6-year-old golden retriever, Alli, and a 6-year-old border collie named Nell.

What are you most excited about in your new role?

I’m excited to be in on the ground floor of these changes in equine services. It’s also exciting to have the opportunity to learn from faculty members who are some of the best in their fields. Lawson Walston, the long-time manager of the equine teaching facility, and I are eager to work together to make Reedy Creek farm one of the top teaching facilities in the country.