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Graduate Programs

Diverse and flexible graduate training opportunities in the biological and biomedical sciences.

Graduate Degree:
Comparative Biomedical Sciences

 919.513.6357   |       CVM Comparative Biomedical Sciences

The Comparative Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program is a multidisciplinary graduate program with faculty who are employing state-of-the-art techniques to address a number of interesting scientific problems in the basic and applied biomedical sciences. The Comparative Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program confers Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees.

The objectives of the CBS graduate program are:

  • To train students to (1) conduct independent research in basic and/or applied biomedical sciences in their area of specialization, (2) have a fundamental and broad-based interdisciplinary knowledge of animal and human health related biomedical sciences , and (3) develop critical thinking, oral and written communication, leadership as well as team skills, and (4) to excel as teachers of biomedical science.
  • To prepare students for competitive careers at academic institutions, government and non-profit agencies, or private industry.

Cutting-edge Research

Most of research faculty with whom students will study have laboratories in the main CVM building or the new biomedical Research Building. The new 100,000 sg. ft. building is located directly across from the main College building and has a transgenic mouse facility for projects related to mouse and animal genomics.

The Program is unique in its ability to offer extensive interdisciplinary training through highly effective liaisons with graduate faculty at other colleges of NC State University, as well as those of nearby Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Many of the Program’s faculty are also members of other University-wide graduate training programs, such as biotechnology, genomics, immunology, physiology, toxicology, and zoology. This provides a large variety of course offerings that embrace a considerable range of subject areas.

Students also benefit from the active working relationships the College has with adjunct faculty from industries (such as GlaxoSmithKline and Novartis), research institutes (such as CIIT Centers for Health Research) and federal agencies (National Institute of Environmental Health and Safety and Environmental Protection Agency) within the nearby Research Triangle Park.

Graduate students will be enrolled as full-time students. A total of 72 credit hours is required to obtain a PhD degree, with the majority of these credits being derived from dissertation research. See the Graduate School web page for specific credit hour and residency requirements.

Students in the program select from one of six concentration areas for their graduate research

CBS Core Courses Required of all Students

CBS 565 Fundamentals of Comparative Biomedical Sciences (3 credits)

ST 511 Experimental Statistics for Biological Sciences (3 credits)

CBS 662 Responsible Conduct of Research (1 credit)

CBS 800 Seminar series (1 credit; minimum 3 credits total for doctoral students; minimum 2 credits total for master’s students)

 Concentration Areas

Cell Biology

The Cell Biology Concentration Area encompasses research at the molecular and cellular levels in the following disciplines: gastroenterology, oncology, pulmonary biology, ophthalmology, reproductive endocrinology, pharmacology, neurophysiology and neuroanatomy, and cellular differentiation and morphogenesis. Research approaches employ a wide variety of molecular, biochemical, pharmacological, and microscopic techniques, utilizing cell culture and whole organisms. Students selecting Cell Biology will focus their research efforts on one or more of these areas.

A highly individualized curriculum of study is designed to meet the needs and interests of the student while satisfying selected requirements by the faculty. These include graduate level cell biology, biochemistry, and cell biology seminars. Additional courses may be chosen by the student and his/her advisor from a large number of college and university offerings.

Courses Required for the Cell Biology Concentration

GN701 Molecular Genetics (3 credits)

CBS 770 Cell Biology (4 credits)

CBS 810C Seminar in Cell Biology (1 credit; minimum 3 credits total for doctoral students; minimum 2 credits total for master’s students)

Other Courses

CBS 890 Doctoral Preliminary Exam (1 credit)

CBS 893 Doctoral Supervised Research (variable credit)

CBS 895 Doctoral Dissertation Research

CBS 896 Summer Dissertation Research (variable credit)

CBS 899 Doctoral Dissertation Preparation

Elective Courses

Elective courses are selected by the student and mentor, and must be approved by the student’s graduate advisory committee. Possible elective course include, but are not limited to, the following:

BCH 701 Macromolecular Structure

BCH 703 Macromolecular Synthesis and Regulation

BCH 705 Molecular Biology of the Cell

BIT 810 Biotechnology Core Technology

GN 701 Molecular Genetics

GN 702 Cellular and Developmental Genetics

GN 761 Advanced Molecular Biology of the Cell

GN 710 Eukaryotic Regulatory Mechanisms

GN 750 Developmental Genetics

GN/MB 758 Prokaryotic Molecular Genetics

GN/BCH 768 Nucleic Acids: Structure and Function

GS 735 Introduction to Genomic Science

CBS 770 Cell Biology

CBS 861 Bacterial Pathogenic Mechanisms

CBS/IMM/MB 783 Advanced Immunology

CBS/IMM 816 Advanced Topics in Immunology and Biotechnology

MB 718 Introductory Virology

MB/IMM 751 (Immunology; Spring)

IMM/TOX 705 Immunotoxicology

IMM 751 Immunology

IMM /PHY 756 Immunogenetics

PHY 702 Reproductive Physiology

PHY 503, 504 General Physiology I and II

PHY 513 Comparative Physiology

PHY 780 Mammalian Endocrinology

ST 701 Experimental Statistics II

TOX 501 General Toxicology

VMM 877 Clinical Laboratory & Necropsy

Concentration Area Leader

Kenneth Adler, PhD

Professor, Cell Biology

Contact:

kbadler@ncsu.edu

Faculty

Ke Cheng, PhD

Molecular Biomedical Sciences

ke_cheng@ncsu.edu

Glenn Cruse, PhD

Molecular Biomedical Sciences

gpcruse@ncsu.edu

Christopher Dekaney, PhD

Molecular Biomedical Sciences

cmdekane@ncsu.edu

John Gadsby, PhD

Molecular Biomedical Sciences

john_gadsby@ncsu.edu

Troy Ghashghaei, PhD

Molecular Biomedical Sciences

troy_ghashghaei@ncsu.edu

Caroline Laplante

Molecular Biomedical Sciences

caroline_laplante@ncsu.edu

Christine McGahan, PhD

Molecular Biomedical Sciences

chris_mcgahan@ncsu.edu

Nanette Nascone-Yoder, PhD

Molecular Biomedical Sciences

nmnascon@ncsu.edu

Sabrina Robertson

Molecular Biomedical Sciences

sedought@ncsu.edu

Philip Sannes, PhD

Molecular Biomedical Sciences

philip_sannes@ncsu.edu

Barbara Sherry, PhD

Molecular Biomedical Sciences

barbara_sherry@ncsu.edu

Jeffrey Yoder, PhD

Molecular Biomedical Sciences

jeff_yoder@ncsu.edu

Immunology

The Immunology concentration area coursework and laboratory research emphasize cellular and molecular biology studies in infectious disease immunology, mucosal immunity and inflammation, immunopathology, immunoparasitology, environmental immunology, and immunology of non-vertebrate species. Our diversified faculty is drawn from the Colleges of Veterinary Medicine, Sciences, and Agriculture and Life Sciences as well as government agencies located in the Research Triangle Park. Interdepartmental cooperation provides a unique atmosphere for the study of immunology in a wide range of species.

The concentration is designed to prepare students for professional research and teaching careers applying cellular and molecular biology techniques to animal and human health problems, associated with the immune system, including infectious disease and inflammation. Our immunology graduates are extremely competitive for positions in universities, pharmaceutical companies, and governmental institutions. North Carolina State University at Raleigh, with close proximity to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Duke University, and the Research Triangle Park, provides a unique biomedical research environment for seminars, meetings, and interaction with other scientists. Graduate research assistantships are available to qualified students.

Courses Required for the Phd Immunology Concentration

MB/IMM 751 Immunology (3 credits)

IMM/CBS 816 Advanced Topics in Immunology (1 credit each semester; 8 semesters required for doctoral students)

IMM/CBS 783 Advanced Immunology OR PO/IMM 757 Comparative Immunology (3 credits)

and ONE of the following:

BCH 553 Biochemistry of Gene Expression (3 credits)

BCH 555 Proteins and molecular mechanisms (3 credits)

BCH 705 Molecular Biology of the Cell (3 credits)

BIT 510 Core Technologies in Molecular and Cellular Biology (4 credits)

CBS 770 Cell Biology (3 credits)

Courses Required for the Ms Immunology Concentration

MB/IMM 751 Immunology (3 credits)

IMM/CBS 816 Advanced Topics in Immunology (1 credit each semester; 4 semesters required for masters students)

Elective Courses for Phd and Ms Students

STAT 512 Experimental Statistics For Biological Sciences II (3 credits)

MB 718 Introductory Virology (3 credits)

BCH 553 Biochemistry of Gene Expression (3 credits)

BCH 555 Proteins and Molecular Mechanisms (3 credits)

CBS 770 Cell Biology (3 credits)

CBS 810 Infectious Disease Pathogenic Mechanisms (1 credit)

BIT 510 Core Technologies in Molecular and Cellular Biology (4 credits)

 

BIT module courses (2 credits each):

BIT562 Gene Expression Analysis: Microarrays

BIT 564 Protein Purification

BIT 565 Real time PCR Techniques

BIT 566 Animal Cell Culture Techniques

BIT 567 PCR and DNA Fingerprinting

BIT 568 Genome Mapping

Elective Courses for MS Students

IMM/CBS 783 Advanced Immunology (3 credits)

PO/IMM 757 Comparative Immunology (3 credits)

Infectious Diseases

Graduate work in the Infectious Disease Concentration Area includes research at the molecular and cellular level in bacteriology, parasitology, and virology, as well as investigations of the host immune response to these agents. Programs focus on etiology, pathogenesis, diagnostic development, vaccine development, and antimicrobial therapies. Programs also focus on gene regulation and host-pathogen interactions that influence pathogenesis. Research approaches employ a wide variety of molecular, biochemical, pharmacological, and microscopic techniques, utilizing cell culture and whole organisms. Students selecting Infectious Disease will focus on one or more of these areas.

A highly individualized curriculum of study is designed to meet the needs and interests of the student while satisfying selected requirements by the faculty. These include graduate level cell biology and biochemistry, as well as graduate level courses relating to the specific discipline chosen (bacteriology, parasitology, or virology). Additional courses may be chosen by the student and his/her advisor from a large number of college and university offerings.

Students entering the Ph.D. program having completed courses equivalent to the required courses may, with the consent of their thesis committee, petition the concentration area Graduate Committee to waive these requirements.

Courses Required for the Infectious Diseases Concentration

CBS 810 Seminar in Infectious Diseases (1 credit; minimum 3 credits total for doctoral students; minimum 2 credits total for master’s students)

Other Courses

CBS 890 Doctoral Preliminary Exam (1 credit)

CBS 893 Doctoral Supervised Research (variable credit)

CBS 895 Doctoral Dissertation Research

CBS 896 Summer Dissertation Research (variable credit)

CBS 899 Doctoral Dissertation Preparation

 Elective Courses

Elective courses are selected by the student and mentor, and must be approved by the student’s graduate advisory committee. Possible elective course include, but are not limited to, the following:

Biochemistry

BCH 701(Macromolecular Structure; Fall)

BCH 703 (Macromolecular Synthesis and Regulation; Fall)

Microbiology and Immunology

MB 703 (Microbial Diversity; Spring alternate years)

MB 714 (Microbial Metabolic Regulation; Fall)

MB 718 (Introductory Virology; Fall)

MB/IMM 751 (Immunology; Spring)

IMM/TOX 705 (Immunotoxicology; Spring)

IMM/CBS 755 (Immunoparasitology; Spring alternate years)

IMM/CBS/MB/PO 756 (Immunogenetics; Fall alternate years)

IMM/PO 757 (Avian Immunology; Fall alternate years)

IMM/CBS/MB 783 (Adv. Immunology; Fall alternate years)

IMM/CBS 816 (Adv. Top. in Immun. and Biotech.; Fall, Spring, Summer)

CBS 770 (Cell Biology; Fall)

CBS 771 (Vet. Med. Virology II; Fall alternate years)

CBS 774 (Epidemiol. of Inf. Dis. of International Importance; Fall alternate years)

CBS 861 ( Bacterial Pathogenic Mechanisms; Spring alternate years)

Molecular and Cell Biology

GN 701 (Molecular Genetics; Fall)

GN 702 (Cellular and Developmental Genetics; Spring)

GN 710 (Eukaryotic Regulatory Mechanisms; Spring alternate years)

GN 750 (Developmental Genetics; Spring alternate years)

GN/ST 756 (Computations Molecular Evolution; Fall alternate years)

GN/MB 758 (Prokaryotic Molecular Genetics; Spring)

GN/BCH 761 (Adv. Molecular Biology of the Cell; Spring alternate years)

GN/BCH 768 (Nucleic Acids: Structure and Function; Spring alternate years)

GN 810X (Special Topics: Genetics; Spring)

BCH 705 (Molecular Biology of the Cell; Spring)

Statistics

ST 501(Exp. Stats. for Biol. Sci. I; Fall & Spring)

ST 701 (Exp. Stats. for Biol. Sci. II; Fall & Spring)

GN/ST 770 (Statistical Concepts in Genetics; Spring alternate years)

Techniques

BIT 810 (Core Technologies In Molecular and Cellular Biology; Summer)

BIT 815 (Advanced Topics In Biotechnology; Summer)

MB 705 (Biological Scanning Electron Microscopy; Spring)

MB 710 (Biological Transmission Electron Microscopy; on demand)

CBS 732 (Electron Microscopy in Vet. Med.; Spring)

Concentration Area Leader

Fred Fuller, PhD

Professor, Microbiology

Contact:

fred_fuller@ncsu.edu

Faculty

Jonathan Fogle, DVM, Ph.D., DACVIM

Population Health and Pathobiology

jefogle@ncsu.edu

Derek Foster, DVM, PhD, DACVIM

Population Health and Pathobiology

derek_foster@ncsu.edu

Isabel Gimeno, DVM, PhD, DACPV

Population Health and Pathobiology

isabel_gimeno@ncsu.edu

Bruce Hammerberg, PhD

Population Health and Pathobiology

bruce_hammerberg@ncsu.edu

Megan Jacob, MS, PhD

Population Health and Pathobiology

megan_jacob@ncsu.edu

Tobias Kaeser, PhD

Population Health and Pathobiology

tekaeser@ncsu.edu

Michael Levy, PhD

Population Health and Pathobiology

mike_levy@ncsu.edu

Xinxia Peng, Ph.D.

Molecular Biomedical Sciences

xpeng5@ncsu.edu

Barbara Sherry, PhD

Molecular Biomedical Sciences

barbara_sherry@ncsu.edu

Casey M. Theriot, PhD

Population Health and Pathobiology

cmtherio@ncsu.edu

Jeffrey Yoder, PhD

Molecular Biomedical Sciences

jeff_yoder@ncsu.edu

Pathology

Graduate work in the Pathology Concentration Area includes research at the molecular and cellular level in infectious disease pathogenesis, oncology, toxicology, hematology, and immunology. Research approaches employ a wide variety of molecular, biochemical, pharmacological, and microscopic techniques, utilizing cell culture and whole organisms. Students selecting Pathology will focus on one or more of these areas.

A highly individualized curriculum of study is designed to meet the needs and interests of the student while satisfying selected requirements by the faculty. These include courses in advanced systemic histopathology, toxicologic pathology, avian pathology, and seminar courses in clinical, necropsy, and surgical pathology. Additional courses may be chosen by the student and his/her advisor from a large number of college and university offerings. An appropriate level of competence in diagnostic pathology must be demonstrated by examination before completion of the graduate program.

Courses Required for the Pathology Concentration

CBS 795 General Pathology (3 credits)

CBS 810 Seminar in Pathology (1 credit; 3 credits total for doctoral students; minimum 2 credits total for master’s students)

Concentration Area Leader

Mac Law, DVM, PhD

Professor, Pathology

Contact:

mac_law@ncsu.edu

Faculty

John Barnes, DVM, PhD, DACPV, DACVP

Population Health and Pathobiology

john_barnes@ncsu.edu

Luke Borst, DVM, PhD, DACVP

Population Health and Pathobiology

luke_borst@ncsu.edu

John Cullen, VMD, PhD, DACVP, FIATP

Population Health and Pathobiology

jcullen@ncsu.edu

Heather Shive, DVM, PhD, DACVP

Population Health and Pathobiology

hrshive@ncsu.edu

Keith Linder, DVM, PhD

Population Health and Pathobiology

keith_linder@ncsu.edu

Pharmacology

Graduate work in the Pharmacology Concentration Area includes research at the molecular and cellular level in pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, drug residues and metabolites, anesthetics and autonomic drugs, pulmonary biology, oncology, ophthalmology, gastroenterology, reproductive endocrinology, and lipid-, peptide-, and oxygen-derived mediators of inflammation. Research approaches employ a wide variety of molecular, biochemical, pharmacological, and microscopic techniques, utilizing cell culture and whole organisms. Students selecting Pharmacology will focus on one or more of these areas.

A highly individualized curriculum of study is designed to meet the needs and interests of the student while satisfying selected requirements by the faculty. These include courses in introductory pharmacology and toxicology, advanced pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, statistics, and participation in a seminar series in pharmacology. Additional courses may be chosen by the student and his/her advisor from a large number of college and university offerings.

Courses Required for the Pharmacology Concentration

CBS 860 Instrumentation in Pharmacological Research (2 credits)

CBS 762 Principles in Pharmacology (3 credits)

CBS 787 Pharmacokinetics (3 credits)

TOX 710 Biochemical Toxicology (3 credits)

CBS 810 Seminar in Pharmacology (1 credit; minimum 3 credits total)

Elective Courses

Other elective courses are approved by the student’s advisory committee. Students requiring foundational courses are encouraged to consider TOX 501 General Toxicology and BCH 451/553 Biochemistry.

Population Medicine

Graduate work in the Population Medicine Concentration Area includes research in epidemiology of a variety of species, medical geography, assessment of management practices on food animal production systems, production medicine for food industries, developing and monitoring systems for health and productivity, computer based record keeping systems, and development of applied statistical and analytic methods. Students selecting Population Medicine will focus on one or more of these areas.

A highly individualized curriculum of study is designed to meet the needs and interests of the student while satisfying selected requirements by the faculty. These include courses in epidemiology, statistics and other quantitative disciplines. Additional courses may be chosen by the student and his/her advisor from a large number of college and university offerings.

Courses Required for the Population Medicine Concentration

ST 512 Experimental statistics for biological sciences II (3 credits)

CBS 580 or UNC EPI 160 or UNC EPI 168 (3 credits)

CBS 580 Clinical Veterinary Epidemiology

EPI 160 Principles of Epidemiology

EPI 168 Fundamentals of Epidemiology

CBS 754 Principles of Analytical Epidemiology (3 credits)

VPH 650 Seminar in Pop Med & Vet Public Health (1 credit; minimum 3 credits total for doctoral students; minimum 2 credits total for master’s students)

Other Courses

CBS 890 Doctoral Preliminary Exam (1 credit)

CBS 893 Doctoral Supervised Research (variable credit)

CBS 895 Doctoral Dissertation Research

CBS 896 Summer Dissertation Research (variable credit)

CBS 899 Doctoral Dissertation Preparation

Other Courses from NC State

CBS760: Molecular Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases of Veterinary and Public Health Importance

CBS 780: Veterinary Production Epidemiology

ST 711: Design of experiments

ST 535: Statistical process control

ST 731: Applied multivariate statistical analysis

ST 505: Applied nonparametric statistics

ST 733: Applied spatial statistics

ST 732: Applied longitudinal data analysis

ST 520: Statistical principles of Clinical Trials and Epidemiology

ST 715: Theory of sampling applied to Survey Design

ST 506: Sampling animal populations

ST 745: Analysis of Survival Data

ST 755: Advanced analysis of variance and variance components

ECG 751: Econometrics

ECG 765 : Mathematical Methods for Economics

ECG 741: Agricultural Production and Supply

ECG 748: Theory of International Trade

Courses taught at UNC School of Public Health Biostatistics or Epidemiology Depts.

Can be used as equivalents to many of the courses noted above.

231 Bayesian Statistics

256 Introduction To Nonparametric Statistics

257 Nonparametric Procedures In Biometric Research

259 Applied Time Series Analysis (3)

260 Advanced Probability And Statistical Inference I & (261) II

262 Generalized Linear Models or

263 Advanced Linear Models

264 Advanced Survey Sampling Methods

265 Linear Models In Categorical Data Analysis (3).

266 Advanced Linear Models

271 Demographic Techniques

280 Theory And Methods For Survival

Concentration Area Leader

Faculty

Glen Almond, DVM, PhD

Population Health and Pathobiology

glen_almond@ncsu.edu

Kevin Anderson, DVM, PhD, DABVP

Population Health and Pathobiology

kevin_anderson@ncsu.edu

Maria Correa, PhD

Population Health and Pathobiology

maria_correa@ncsu.edu

Derek Foster, DVM, PhD, DACVIM

Population Health and Pathobiology

derek_foster@ncsu.edu

Cristina Lanzas, DVM, PhD

Population Health and Pathobiology

clanzas@ncsu.edu

David Ley, DVM, PhD

Population Health and Pathobiology

david_ley@ncsu.edu

Jay Levine, DVM, MPH

Population Health and Pathobiology

Andrew Stringer, BVSc, PhD, MRCVS

Population Health and Pathobiology

apstringer@ncsu.edu

Admission Requirements

Students are accepted into the Comparative Biomedical Sciences program based on their academic records (GPA) as undergraduates and/or as veterinary or medical students, results of the GRE, letters of recommendation and expression of interest in comparative biomedical research. For the Ph.D. program, special consideration will be given to students who have had research experience (either an M.S. degree or other laboratory experience), especially in a biomedical discipline, or students who are completing strong clinical residency programs. To be considered for financial aid (a graduate assistantship), completed applications must be received by December 1st for fall admission. Including a Curriculum Vitae with your application materials is recommended.

  • Completed NCSU Graduate School On-Line Application
  • Meet all NCSU Graduate School Admission Requirements
  • Official transcripts to be uploaded with NCSU Graduate School Application
  • GRE scores to be uploaded with NCSU Graduate School Application (GRE requirement is waived for US applicants with a DVM/VMD degree)
  • Recommended Curriculum Vitae to be uploaded with NCSU Graduate School Application
  • Expression of interest in comparative biomedical research (Personal Statement)
  • Letters of Recommendation

To be admitted, a student should be a graduate of a major accredited biological science or medical science program. Students lacking appropriate courses may be considered for admission but will be required to make up certain undergraduate deficiencies without graduate credit.

Student Financial Support

Graduate assistantships are available to students in the Comparative Biomedical Sciences Program through the College of Veterinary Medicine, College of Sciences, affiliated departments, graduate training grants, and individual faculty members in the Comparative Biomedical Sciences program.  Doctoral students are given priority for College level graduate assistantships.

Degree Process

Graduate Advisory Committee

Before the end of the first year of the MS program and second year of the PhD program, the student is expected to select a graduate committee. This Committee will serve to direct and guide the student through the PhD program. The Committee will consist of the Supervisor (Chairperson) and a minimum of three other members of the Graduate Faculty. A member of the graduate faculty from outside of the degree program appointed by the Graduate School will serve to monitor the student’s oral examinations. The Graduate School representative is to ensure that the process is conducted in a manner that is fair to the student.

Preliminary Exam

It is expected that after the first year, and before the beginning of the third year, the doctoral student will take a comprehensive preliminary examination. The Graduate School of NCSU requires that this exam be taken not earlier than the end of the second year, and not later than one semester (four months) before the final oral examination. The student should schedule this examination at a convenient time after consulting with his/her advisor. This examination is intended to be comprehensive and assess the student’s preparations to be a scholar in the concentration area discipline. The Preliminary Examination must consist of a written component in a research grant proposal format. The NIH NRSA individual fellowship application research plan component is the recommended format, but the committee can choose another format for the proposal. The topic of the written examination grant proposal is determined by the graduate committee and should be related to (but not necessarily the same as) the thesis project. A closed-book exam consisting of a series of essay questions or problems based on previous coursework and research can also be required by the committee. Written questions generally take one day to complete. The committee should agree on the format and provide instructions to the student during the first committee meeting. The written portion of the exam should be submitted to the committee at least one month prior to the scheduled oral examination and no later than two weeks prior to the oral examination.  Satisfactory completion of the written examination is required before a candidate can sit for the oral preliminary examination. The oral examination is designed to determine the depth and breadth of the student’s knowledge in their concentration area discipline and to test the student’s ability to relate factual knowledge to specific circumstances, to use this knowledge with accuracy and promptness. It will consist of questions asked by members of the student’s graduate committee. Students are expected to prepare and deliver a short presentation of their written grant proposal for the oral examination.

Dissertation Proposal

Graduate students are required to submit a Plan of Work in the MyPack Portal in consultation with their advisory committee. Master’s students should complete the plan of work once they’ve competed half of the credits required for their degree. Doctoral students should complete the on-line plan of work once they’ve completed 18 hours of coursework. The Plan of Work must be approved by the student’s advisory committee, Director of the Comparative Biomedical Sciences (CBS) Program, and the Graduate School. Students should meet with their advisory committee prior to submitting the on-line plan of work to present a written proposal. This written proposal should include a list of proposed courses, a brief description of the proposed field of study and research focus area, and a list of the members selected for the Graduate Advisory Committee. The selection of a dissertation must follow the guidelines imposed by the Graduate School. The publication, Thesis and Dissertation Guide is a helpful guide. During the second year, the student should be in preparation of research proposals to define the scope of work for the dissertation. This proposal can be used to submit to granting agencies for research funding. Description of research project should include a background of the proposed study area (literature review), hypotheses to be tested, description of studies to be conducted, methods to be used, methods of analysis, and a time-line that includes significant milestones.

Final Oral Examination

The final oral examination will take place after the dissertation is complete, except for revisions that the committee feels are necessary. This examination must take place not earlier than one semester after the Preliminary Examination. The examination consists of oral questions concerning methods and conclusions reached in the research and as reported in the dissertation.

Code of Conduct

All graduate students are required to adhere to the NCSU Code of Student Conduct.

Please send questions/comments to:
Director of CBS program Dr. Sam Jones  sam_jones@ncsu.edu