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Graduate Programs

Diverse and flexible graduate training opportunities in the biological and biomedical sciences.

Graduate Degree:
Comparative Biomedical Sciences

 919.513.6357   |       CVM Comparative Biomedical Sciences

The Comparative Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program is a multidisciplinary graduate program with faculty who are employing state-of-the-art techniques to address a number of interesting scientific problems in the basic and applied biomedical sciences. The Comparative Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program confers Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees.

The objectives of the CBS graduate program are:

  • To train students to (1) conduct independent research in basic and/or applied biomedical sciences in their area of specialization, (2) have a fundamental and broad-based interdisciplinary knowledge of animal and human health related biomedical sciences , and (3) develop critical thinking, oral and written communication, leadership as well as team skills, and (4) to excel as teachers of biomedical science.
  • To prepare students for competitive careers at academic institutions, government and non-profit agencies, or private industry.

Cutting-edge Research

Most of research faculty with whom students will study have laboratories in the main CVM building or the new biomedical Research Building. The new 100,000 sg. ft. building is located directly across from the main College building and has a transgenic mouse facility for projects related to mouse and animal genomics.

The Program is unique in its ability to offer extensive interdisciplinary training through highly effective liaisons with graduate faculty at other colleges of NC State University, as well as those of nearby Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Many of the Program’s faculty are also members of other University-wide graduate training programs, such as biotechnology, genomics, immunology, physiology, toxicology, and zoology. This provides a large variety of course offerings that embrace a considerable range of subject areas.

Students also benefit from the active working relationships the College has with adjunct faculty from industries (such as GlaxoSmithKline and Novartis), research institutes (such as CIIT Centers for Health Research) and federal agencies (National Institute of Environmental Health and Safety and Environmental Protection Agency) within the nearby Research Triangle Park.

Graduate students will be enrolled as full-time students. A total of 72 credit hours is required to obtain a PhD degree, with the majority of these credits being derived from dissertation research. See the Graduate School web page for specific credit hour and residency requirements.

Students in the program select from one of seven concentration areas for their graduate research

CBS Core Courses Required of all Students

CBS 565 Fundamentals of Comparative Biomedical Sciences (3 credits)

ST 511 Experimental Statistics for Biological Sciences (3 credits)

CBS 662 Responsible Conduct of Research (1 credit)

CBS 800 Seminar series (1 credit; minimum 3 credits total for doctoral students; minimum 2 credits total for master’s students)

 Concentration Areas

Cell Biology

The Cell Biology Concentration Area encompasses research at the molecular and cellular levels in the following disciplines: gastroenterology, oncology, pulmonary biology, ophthalmology, reproductive endocrinology, pharmacology, neurophysiology and neuroanatomy, and cellular differentiation and morphogenesis. Research approaches employ a wide variety of molecular, biochemical, pharmacological, and microscopic techniques, utilizing cell culture and whole organisms. Students selecting Cell Biology will focus their research efforts on one or more of these areas.

A highly individualized curriculum of study is designed to meet the needs and interests of the student while satisfying selected requirements by the faculty. These include graduate level cell biology, biochemistry, and cell biology seminars. Additional courses may be chosen by the student and his/her advisor from a large number of college and university offerings.

Courses Required for the Cell Biology Concentration

GN701 Molecular Genetics; Fall (3 credits)

CBS 770 Cell Biology; Spring (4 credits)

CBS 810 Seminar in Cell Biology (1 credit; minimum 3 credits total for doctoral students; minimum 2 credits total for master’s students)

Elective Courses

Elective courses are selected by the student and mentor, and must be approved by the student’s graduate advisory committee. Possible elective course include, but are not limited to, the following:

BCH 701 Macromolecular Structure; Fall (3 credits)

BCH 703 Macromolecular Synthesis and Regulation; Fall (3 credits)

BCH 705 Molecular Biology of the Cell; Spring (3 credits)

GN 701 Molecular Genetics; Fall (3 credits)

GN 702 Cellular and Developmental Genetics; Spring (3 credits)

GN 750 Developmental Genetics; Spring alternate years(3 credits)

GN/MB 758 Microbial Genetics & Genomics; Spring (3 credits)

GN 761 Advanced Molecular Biology of the Cell; Spring alternate years (3 credits)

GN/BCH 768 Nucleic Acids: Structure and Function; Spring alternate years (3 credits)

CBS/IMM/MB 783 Advanced Immunology; Fall alternate odd years (3 credits)

CBS/IMM 816 Advanced Topics in Immunology; Fall (1 credits)

MB 718 Introductory Virology; Fall alternate odd years (3 credits)

IMM/TOX 705 Immunotoxicology; Spring (2 credits)

IMM 751 Immunology; Spring (3 credits)

PHY 503, 504 General Physiology I and II (3 credits)

PHY 702 Reproductive Physiology of Mammals; Fall & Spring (3 credits)

PHY 780 Mammalian Endocrinology (3 credits)

ST 701 Statistical Theory I; Fall (3 credits)

TOX 501 Principles of Toxicology; Spring (4 credits)

Name Email Concentration Research Emphasis
Kenneth Adler kbadler@ncsu.edu Cell Biology Interactions of airway epithelium with inflammatory mediators and inhaled pollutants
Scott Bailey csbailey@ncsu.edu Cell Biology Diseases of Pregnancy in the Mare
Anthony Blikslager atbliksl@ncsu.edu Cell Biology Mechanism of Intestinal Mucosal Repair
Matthew Breen mbreen3@ncsu.edu Cell Biology Cytogentics of Cancer
Ke Cheng ke_cheng@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Phamacology Regenerative medicine by using patient-derived stem cells, biomaterials, micro-RNAs and bioengineering approaches
Glenn Cruse gpcruse@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Immunology, Phamacology Mechanisms of receptor signaling, ion channel physiology and cytoskeletal reorganization that determine mast cell function
Christopher Dekaney cmdekane@ncsu.edu Cell Biology The roles Paneth cells, from the intestinal epithelium, play in epithelial repair – particularly within the context of providing a stem cell niche
John Gadsby jgadsby@ncsu.edu Cell Biology Regulation of the Corpus Luteum
Troy Ghashghaei tghashg@ncsu.edu Cell Biology Development and Function of Adult Neural Stem Cells
Brian Gilger bgilger@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Phamacology Pharmacology of the Eye
Jody Gookin jgookin@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Infectious Diseases Host-pathogen Interactions in the Gut
Eleanor Hawkins echawkin@ncsu.edu Cell Biology Respiratory medicine, particularly pulmonology and Chronic Bronchitis
Paul Hess prhess@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases Targeted Therapeutics of Immune-mediated Diseases
Samuel Jones sljones@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases Regulation of Neutrophil Motility
Caroline Laplante claplan@ncsu.edu Cell Biology
Duncan Lascelles dxlascel@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Phamacology Mechanism and Treatment of Pain
Christopher Mariani clmarian@ncsu.edu Cell Biology Biology of Cancers of the Brain
Chris McGahan mcmcgaha@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Phamacology Regulation of Fe metabolism in the eye, the involvement of Fe in cataract formation, and mechanisms underlying post-surgical regrowth of lens tissue
Kathryn Meurs kmmeurs@ncsu.edu Cell Biology Genomics of Cardiac Disease
Freya Mowat fmmowat@ncsu.edu Cell Biology Defining the underlying causes of SARDS in dogs
Nanette Nascone-Yoder nmnascon@ncsu.edu Cell Biology Development of the Gastrointestinal Tract
Micheal Nolan mwnolan@ncsu.edu Cell Biology Normal tissue radiobiology, and the study of inflammation and immunity as they relate to local and systemic responses to irradiation
Natasha Olby njolby@ncsu.edu Cell Biology Treatment of Spinal Cord Injury and Genomics of Neurological Diseases
Thierry Olivry tolivry@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases Pathogenesis and Therapy of Pruritis, Atopic Dermatitis and Autoimmune Diseases
Sabrina Robertson sedought@ncsu.edu Cell Biology Effects of manipulating NE neuron activity in vivo
Marcelo Rodriguez-Puebla mrodrig@ncsu.edu Cell Biology Cell cycle regulation, skin carcinogenesis, mouse model, tumor biology
Korinn Saker kesaker@ncsu.edu Cell Biology Nutrition of Cancer
Phillip Sannes plsannes@ncsu.edu Cell Biology Concentration Leader Interactions between epithelial cell populations and connective tissue matrices
Robert Smart rcsmart@unity.ncsu.edu Cell Biology Chemical carcinogenesis and development in model laboratory systems
Lauren Schnabel lvschnab@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases Stem Cell Biology and Immunology
Barbara Sherry bsherry@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Infectious Diseases We study viral infections of the heart to identify the viral and host determinants of cardiac damage
Steven Suter sesuter@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases, Pathology Genetics and Therapy of Cancer
Jeffrey Yoder jayoder@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases Characterizations and Function of Innate Immune Response Genes

Immunology

The Immunology concentration area coursework and laboratory research emphasize cellular and molecular biology studies in infectious disease immunology, mucosal immunity and inflammation, immunopathology, immunoparasitology, environmental immunology, and immunology of non-vertebrate species. Our diversified faculty is drawn from the Colleges of Veterinary Medicine, Sciences, and Agriculture and Life Sciences as well as government agencies located in the Research Triangle Park. Interdepartmental cooperation provides a unique atmosphere for the study of immunology in a wide range of species.

The concentration is designed to prepare students for professional research and teaching careers applying cellular and molecular biology techniques to animal and human health problems, associated with the immune system, including infectious disease and inflammation. Our immunology graduates are extremely competitive for positions in universities, pharmaceutical companies, and governmental institutions. North Carolina State University at Raleigh, with close proximity to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Duke University, and the Research Triangle Park, provides a unique biomedical research environment for seminars, meetings, and interaction with other scientists. Graduate research assistantships are available to qualified students.

Courses Required for the Phd Immunology Concentration

MB/IMM 751 Immunology (3 credits)

IMM/CBS 816 Advanced Topics in Immunology (1 credit each semester; 8 semesters required for doctoral students)

IMM/CBS 783 Advanced Immunology OR PO/IMM 757 Comparative Immunology (3 credits)

and ONE of the following:

BCH 553 Biochemistry of Gene Expression (3 credits)

BCH 555 Proteins and molecular mechanisms (3 credits)

BCH 705 Molecular Biology of the Cell (3 credits)

BIT 510 Core Technologies in Molecular and Cellular Biology (4 credits)

CBS 770 Cell Biology (3 credits)

Courses Required for the Ms Immunology Concentration

MB/IMM 751 Immunology (3 credits)

IMM/CBS 816 Advanced Topics in Immunology (1 credit each semester; 4 semesters required for masters students)

Elective Courses for Phd and Ms Students

STAT 512 Experimental Statistics For Biological Sciences II (3 credits)

MB 718 Introductory Virology (3 credits)

BCH 553 Biochemistry of Gene Expression (3 credits)

BCH 555 Proteins and Molecular Mechanisms (3 credits)

CBS 770 Cell Biology (3 credits)

CBS 810 Infectious Disease Pathogenic Mechanisms (1 credit)

BIT 510 Core Technologies in Molecular and Cellular Biology (4 credits)

 

BIT module courses (2 credits each):

BIT562 Gene Expression Analysis: Microarrays

BIT 564 Protein Purification

BIT 565 Real time PCR Techniques

BIT 566 Animal Cell Culture Techniques

BIT 567 PCR and DNA Fingerprinting

BIT 568 Genome Mapping

Elective Courses for MS Students

IMM/CBS 783 Advanced Immunology (3 credits)

PO/IMM 757 Comparative Immunology (3 credits)

 

Name Email Concentrations Research Emphasis
Adam Birkenheuer ajbirken@ncsu.edu Immunology, Infectious Diseases General Internal Medicine and Infectious Disease
Petra Bizikova petra_bizikova@ncsu.edu Immunology, Infectious Diseases Autoimmune and allergic skin disease of small animals
Ed Breitschwerdt ed_breitschwerdt@ncsu.edu Immunology, Infectious Diseases Detection, characterization, and treatment of canine/feline bacterial pathogens
Glenn Cruse gpcruse@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Immunology, Phamacology Regulation and therapeutic intervention of mast cell-mediated inflammation and allergy
Jonathan Fogle jefogle@ncsu.edu Immunology Animal models for T cell dysfunction in HIV infection and Immune dysfunction in cancer and anti-tumor immunity
Fred Fuller fred_fuller@ncsu.edu Immunology, Infectious Diseases Concentration Leader Equine infectious anemia virus
Isabel Gimeno isabel_gimeno@ncsu.edu Immunology, Infectious Diseases Poultry Pathology and Immunology
Bruce Hammerberg bruce_hammerberg@ncsu.edu Immunology, Infectious Diseases Allergic Disease
Paul Hess paul_hess@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases Targeted Therapeutics of Immune-mediated Diseases
Samuel Jones sljones@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases Regulation of Neutrophil Motility
Tobias Kaeser tekaeser@ncsu.edu Immunology, Infectious Diseases, Population Medicine Swine immunology and large animal models
Matthew Koci mdkoci@ncsu.edu Immunology Avian Immunology
Scott Laster smlaster@ncsu.edu Immunology Innate Immunity and Inflammation
Thierry Olivry thierry_olivry@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases Pathogenesis and Therapy of Pruritis, Atopic Dermatitis and Autoimmune Diseases
Lauren Schnabel lvschnab@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases Stem cell biology and Immunology
Frank Scholle fscholl@ncsu.edu Immunology Viral Immunology
Michael Sikes mlsikes@ncsu.edu Immunology Lymphocyte development and differentiation
Steven Suter sesuter@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases, Pathology Genetics and Therapy of Cancer
Sue Tonkonogy sue_tonkonogy@ncsu.edu Immunology Concentration leader Immune regulation in the gastrointestinal tract
Jeffrey Yoder jayoder@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases Characterizations and Function of Innate Immune Response Genes

Infectious Diseases

Graduate work in the Infectious Disease Concentration Area includes research at the molecular and cellular level in bacteriology, parasitology, and virology, as well as investigations of the host immune response to these agents. Programs focus on etiology, pathogenesis, diagnostic development, vaccine development, and antimicrobial therapies. Programs also focus on gene regulation and host-pathogen interactions that influence pathogenesis. Research approaches employ a wide variety of molecular, biochemical, pharmacological, and microscopic techniques, utilizing cell culture and whole organisms. Students selecting Infectious Disease will focus on one or more of these areas.

A highly individualized curriculum of study is designed to meet the needs and interests of the student while satisfying selected requirements by the faculty. These include graduate level cell biology and biochemistry, as well as graduate level courses relating to the specific discipline chosen (bacteriology, parasitology, or virology). Additional courses may be chosen by the student and his/her advisor from a large number of college and university offerings.

Students entering the Ph.D. program having completed courses equivalent to the required courses may, with the consent of their thesis committee, petition the concentration area Graduate Committee to waive these requirements.

Courses Required for the Infectious Diseases Concentration

CBS 810 Seminar in Infectious Diseases (1 credit; minimum 3 credits total for doctoral students; minimum 2 credits total for master’s students)

 Elective Courses

Elective courses are selected by the student and mentor, and must be approved by the student’s graduate advisory committee. Possible elective course include, but are not limited to, the following:

Biochemistry

BCH 701 Macromolecular Structure; Fall (3 credits)

BCH 703 Macromolecular Synthesis and Regulation; Fall (3 credits)

Microbiology and immunology

MB 714 Microbial Metabolic Regulation; Fall (3 credits)

MB 718 Introductory Virology; Fall alternate odd years (3 credits)

MB/IMM 751 Immunology; Spring (3 credits)

IMM/TOX 705 Immunotoxicology; Spring (2 credits)

IMM/CBS 755 Immunoparasitology; Spring alternate years (2 credits)

IMM/PO 757 Comparative Immunology; Spring alternate odd years (3 credits)

IMM/CBS/MB 783 Adv. Immunology; Fall alternate years (3 credits)

IMM/CBS 816 Adv. Topics in Immunology; Fall and Spring (1 credits)

Comparative biomdeical sciences

CBS 770 Cell Biology; Spring (3 credits)

CBS 771 Cancer Biology; Fall (4 credits)

CBS 774 Epidemiol. of Inf. Dis. of International Importance; Fall alternate years

Molecular and cell biology

GN 701 Molecular Genetics; Fall (3 credits)

GN 702 Cellular and Developmental Genetics; Spring (3 credits)

GN 750 Developmental Genetics; Spring alternate years (3 credits)

GN/ST 756 Computations Molecular Evolution; Fall alternate years (3 credits)

GN/MB 758 Microbial Genetics & Genomics; Spring (3 credits)

GN/BCH 761 Adv. Molecular Biology of the Cell; Spring alternate years (3 credits)

GN/BCH 768 Nucleic Acids: Structure and Function; Spring alternate years (3 credits)

GN 810-xxx Special Topics in Genetics; Fall and Spring (1-6 credits)

BCH 705 Molecular Biology of the Cell; Spring (3 credits)

Statistics

ST 501 Fundamentals of Statistical Inference I; Fall & Summer (3 credits)

ST 701 Statistical Theory I; Fall (3 credits)

Techniques

BIT 815 Advanced Topics In Biotechnology; Summer (1-6 credits)

Name Email Concentrations Research Emphasis
Adam Birkenheuer ajbirken@ncsu.edu Immunology, Infectious Diseases General Internal Medicine and Infectious Disease
Petra Bizikova pbiziko@ncsu.edu Immunology, Infectious Diseases Autoimmune and allergic skin disease of small animals
Ed Breitschwerdt ebbreits@ncsu.edu Immunology, Infectious Diseases Detection, characterization, and treatment of canine/feline bacterial pathogens
Johanna Elfenbein jrelfenb@ncsu.edu Infectious Diseases Salmonella Pathogenesis and equine coli
Derek Foster dmfoster@ncsu.edu Infectious Diseases Antimicrobial resistance, food animal pharmacology, gastrointestinal physiology
Fred Fuller ffuller@ncsu.edu Immunology, Infectious Diseases Concentration Leader Equine infectious anemia virus
Isabel Gimeno imgimeno@ncsu.edu Immunology, Infectious Diseases Poultry Pathology and Immunology
Jody Gookin jgookin@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Infectious Diseases Host-pathogen Interactions in the Gut
Bruce Hammerberg bhammerb@ncsu.edu Immunology, Infectious Diseases Allergic Disease
Paul Hess prhess@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases Targeted Therapeutics of Immune-mediated Diseases
Megan Jacob mejacob@ncsu.edu Infectious Diseases Antimicrobial Resistance, E. coli transmission and ecology, Bacteriology diagnostics
Samuel Jones sljones@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases Regulation of Neutrophil Motility
Tobias Kaeser tekaeser@ncsu.edu Immunology, Infectious Diseases, Population Medicine Swine immunology and large animal models
Matthew Koci MDKoci@ncsu.edu Immunology, Infectious Diseases Avian Immunology
Scott Laster scott_laster@ncsu.edu Immunology, Infectious Diseases Innate Immunity and Inflammation
Michael Levy mike_levy@ncsu.edu Infectious Diseases Immunoparasitology
Thierry Olivry tolivry@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases Pathogenesis and Therapy of Pruritis, Atopic Dermatitis and Autoimmune Diseases
Xinxia Peng xpeng5@ncsu.edu Infectious Diseases Noncoding RNA, immunity, and target identification
Lauren Schnabel lvschnab@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases Stem cell biology and Immunology
Frank Scholle frank_scholle@ncsu.edu Immunology, Infectious Diseases Viral Immunology
Barbara Sherry bsherry@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Infectious Diseases We study viral infections of the heart to identify the viral and host determinants of cardiac damage
Michael Sikes mike_sikes@ncsu.edu Immunology, Infectious Diseases Lymphocyte development and differentiation
Steven Suter sesuter@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases, Pathology Genetics and Therapy of Cancer
Casey Theriot cmtherio@ncsu.edu Infectious Diseases Identifying the role of the gastrointestinal tract microbiome and metabolome in shaping colonization resistance against Clostridium difficile
Susan Tonkonogy suet@ncsu.edu Immunology Concentration leader Immune regulation in the gastrointestinal tract
Jeffrey Yoder jayoder@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases Characterizations and Function of Innate Immune Response Genes

Neurosciences

The Neurosciences Concentration at North Carolina State University is designed to prepare students for professional research and teaching careers in the area of neurobiology and to address animal and human health problems associated with the nervous system. Course work and laboratory research in the Neurosciences concentration emphasize studies on brain and behavior that span the range of molecular, cellular, tissue, and physiological aspects of the developing, adult, and aging central and peripheral nervous systems. Our faculty are spread across the university including the Colleges of Veterinary Medicine, Sciences, Engineering, and Agriculture and Life Sciences. Faculty are highly collaborative with expertise in developmental neurobiology, electrophysiology, neuroendocrinology, neurotoxicology, neurogenetics, and behavioral biology in both vertebrate and invertebrate model organisms. Ample collaborations exist with laboratories at UNC Chapel Hill, Duke, and agencies within the Research Triangle Park. As a land-grant university North Carolina State University provides a unique biomedical research environment, which is enhanced through seminars, symposia, and interactive workshops. Graduate research assistantships are available to qualified students who are successfully admitted to the CBS graduate program. Neurosciences graduates are well positioned to compete for positions in universities, pharmaceutical companies, and governmental institutions.

For more information about our program please visit: https://research.ncsu.edu/neurosciences/

COURSES REQUIRED FOR THE PHD Neurosciences CONCENTRATION

  • CBS/BIO 705 Fundamentals of Neuroscience; Fall (3 credits)
  • CBS/BIO 805 Special Topics in Neuroscience; Spring (1 credit, minimum 3 credits total for doctoral students; minimum 2 credits total for master’s students)

ELECTIVE COURSES

Elective courses are selected by the student and mentor, and must be approved by the student’s graduate advisory committee. Possible elective course include, but are not limited to, the following:

Biochemistry

BCH 701 Macromolecular Structure; Fall (3 credits)

BCH 703 Macromolecular Synthesis and Regulation; Fall (3 credits)

Microbiology and immunology

MB 714 Microbial Metabolic Regulation; Fall (3 credits)

MB 718 Introductory Virology; Fall alternate odd years (3 credits)

MB/IMM 751 Immunology; Spring (3 credits)

IMM/TOX 705 Immunotoxicology; Spring (2 credits)

IMM/CBS 755 Immunoparasitology; Spring alternate years (2 credits)

IMM/PO 757 Comparative Immunology; Spring alternate odd years (3 credits)

IMM/CBS/MB 783 Adv. Immunology; Fall alternate years (3 credits)

IMM/CBS 816 Adv. Topics in Immunology; Fall and Spring (1 credits)

Comparative biomdeical sciences

CBS 770 Cell Biology; Spring (3 credits)

CBS 771 Cancer Biology; Fall (4 credits)

CBS 774 Epidemiol. of Inf. Dis. of International Importance; Fall alternate years

Molecular and cell biology

GN 701 Molecular Genetics; Fall (3 credits)

GN 702 Cellular and Developmental Genetics; Spring (3 credits)

GN 750 Developmental Genetics; Spring alternate years (3 credits)

GN/ST 756 Computations Molecular Evolution; Fall alternate years (3 credits)

GN/MB 758 Microbial Genetics & Genomics; Spring (3 credits)

GN/BCH 761 Adv. Molecular Biology of the Cell; Spring alternate years (3 credits)

GN/BCH 768 Nucleic Acids: Structure and Function; Spring alternate years (3 credits)

GN 810-xxx Special Topics in Genetics; Fall and Spring (1-6 credits)

BCH 705 Molecular Biology of the Cell; Spring (3 credits)

Statistics

ST 501 Fundamentals of Statistical Inference I; Fall & Summer (3 credits)

ST 701 Statistical Theory I; Fall (3 credits)

Techniques

BIT 815 Advanced Topics In Biotechnology; Summer (1-6 credits)

Name Email Concentrations Research Emphasis
Robert R.H. Anholt anholt@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Genetics; Toxicology & Environmental Health Sciences
Alper Bozkurt alper.bozkurt@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Bioelectronics Engineering (Including Bioinstrumentation, Biomechatronics, Biomimetic Systems)
Patricia A. Estes pat_estes@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Education and Public Outreach; Genetics; Integrative Physiology, Neuroscience & Behavior
Troy Ghashghaei troy_ghashghaei@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Concentration Leader Development and aging of the adult stem cells and their ependymal niche in the forebrain
John Godwin john_godwin@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Bioinformatics; Functional Genomics; Genetics; Integrative Physiology, Neuroscience & Behavior
He (Helen) Huang hhuang11@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Neural-machine interface, wearer-robot interaction, prosthetics and exoskeleton, human-machine symbiosis, rehabilitation engineering
Albert Keung ajkeung@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Synthetic Biology; Neural and Stem Cell Engineering, Bioengineering
David Lalush david_lalush@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Biomedical Imaging
Duncan Lascelles duncan_lascelles@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Neurosciences, Pharmacology Development of algometry methods in spontaneous disease animal models
Chris McGahan chris_mcgahan@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Neurosciences, Pharmacology Regulation of Fe metabolism in the eye, the involvement of Fe in cataract formation, mechanisms underlying post-surgical regrowth of lens tissue, uveitis, retinal physiology & pathology
John Meitzen jemeitze@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Integrative Physiology, Neuroscience & Behavior
Santosh Mishra skmishra@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying chronic itch and possibly pain in mice
Freya Mowat fmmowat@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Neurosciences Defining the underlying causes of SARDS in dogs
Karen Munana fmmowat@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Canine epilepsy- with focus on causes of refractory (poorly controlled) epilepsy and development of more effective treatments for dogs with seizures
Casey Nestor ccnestor@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Neuroendocrinology underlying the link between reproduction and energy homeostasis for puberty onset, steroid negative feedback, and food intake in sheep
Jun Ninomiya-Tsuji jun_tsuji@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Elucidation of the mechanisms of how TAK1 signaling regulates ROS and tissue homeostasis
Natasha Olby natasha_olby@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Neurosciences Understanding the genetic basis of hereditary neurodegenerative diseases and brain neoplasia
Thierry Olivry thierry_olivry@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases, Neurosciences Investigating the pathogenesis and therapy of itch and atopic dermatitis in dogs
Heather Patisaul hbpatisa@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) alter neuroendocrine pathways in the brain related to sex specific physiology and behavior
Emilie Rissman e_rissman@ncsu.edu Neurosciences How estrogens modulate sex differences in the brain and behavior
Sabrina Robertson sedought@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Neurosciences Mapping the connections and functions of all neurons in the brain
Adriana San-Miguel asanmiguel@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Systems Biology, Microfluidics, Quantitative Biology, High-throughput Experimental Platforms
Coby Schal coby@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Urban Entomology, Insect Behavior, Chemical Ecology, Insect Physiology
Barbara Sherman barbara_sherman@ncsu.edu Neurosciences, Population Medicine Modulation of anxiety, fear, and aggression in companion animals
Leslie Sombers leslie_sombers@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Real-time electrochemical measurements of rapidly fluctuating small molecules in tissue

Pathology

Graduate work in the Pathology Concentration Area includes research at the molecular and cellular level in infectious disease pathogenesis, oncology, toxicology, hematology, and immunology. Research approaches employ a wide variety of molecular, biochemical, pharmacological, and microscopic techniques, utilizing cell culture and whole organisms. Students selecting Pathology will focus on one or more of these areas.

A highly individualized curriculum of study is designed to meet the needs and interests of the student while satisfying selected requirements by the faculty. These include courses in advanced systemic histopathology, toxicologic pathology, avian pathology, and seminar courses in clinical, necropsy, and surgical pathology. Additional courses may be chosen by the student and his/her advisor from a large number of college and university offerings. An appropriate level of competence in diagnostic pathology must be demonstrated by examination before completion of the graduate program.

Courses Required for the Pathology Concentration

CBS 795 General Pathology (3 credits)

CBS 810 Seminar in Pathology (1 credit; 3 credits total for doctoral students; minimum 2 credits total for master’s students)

Name Email Concentration Research Emphasis
John Barnes hjbarnes@ncsu.edu Pathology Pathogenesis of spondylitis in broiler chickens caused by Enterococcus cecorum and Wooden Breast
Luke Borst lbborst@ncsu.edu Pathology Pathogenic Enterococcus Cecorum, Enterococcal Spondylitis (Kinky Back)
John Cullen jcullen@ncsu.edu Pathology Drug-induced hepatic disease, animal models of viral hepatitis
Oscar Fletcher ojfletch@ncsu.edu Pathology Basic Responses of Avian Tissues to Injury
Mac Law jmlaw@ncsu.edu Pathology Mechanistic investigations using histopathology, molecular biology, and analytical techniques
Keith Linder kelinder@ncsu.edu Pathology Skin Pathology, Comparative Pathology
Heather Shive hrshive@ncsu.edu Pathology Uses the zebrafish model (Danio rerio) to discover conserved molecular mechanisms that mediate carcinogenesis
Steven Suter sesuter@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases, Pathology Genetics and Therapy of Cancer

 

Pharmacology

Graduate work in the Pharmacology Concentration Area includes research at the molecular and cellular level in pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, drug residues and metabolites, anesthetics and autonomic drugs, pulmonary biology, oncology, ophthalmology, gastroenterology, reproductive endocrinology, and lipid-, peptide-, and oxygen-derived mediators of inflammation. Research approaches employ a wide variety of molecular, biochemical, pharmacological, and microscopic techniques, utilizing cell culture and whole organisms. Students selecting Pharmacology will focus on one or more of these areas.

A highly individualized curriculum of study is designed to meet the needs and interests of the student while satisfying selected requirements by the faculty. These include courses in introductory pharmacology and toxicology, advanced pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, statistics, and participation in a seminar series in pharmacology. Additional courses may be chosen by the student and his/her advisor from a large number of college and university offerings.

Courses Required for the Pharmacology Concentration

BCH 553 Biochemistry of Gene Expression; Fall, Spring, & Summer (3 credits)

TOX 701 Fundamentals of Toxicology; Fall (3 credits)

TOX 710 Molecular and Biochemical Toxicology; Spring (3 credits)

CBS 762 Principles in Pharmacology; Spring (3 credits)

CBS 787 Pharmacokinetics; Fall alternate years (3 credits)

CBS 810 Seminar in Pharmacology (1 credit; minimum 3 credits total)

CBS 860 Techniques in Pharmacological Research; Fall (2 credits)

Elective Courses

Other elective courses are approved by the student’s advisory committee.

Name Email Concentration Research Emphasis
Belinda Akpa bsakpa@ncsu.edu Pharmacology Mathematical models to connect molecular events to dynamic physiological outcomes
Ronald Baynes rebaynes@ncsu.edu Pharmacology Concentration Leader Physiochemical and chemical-biological interactions in epidermal corneocytes and intercellular lipids in the epidermis that can influence dermal absorption of complex mixtures
Ke Cheng ke_cheng@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Pharmacology Regenerative medicine using patient-derived stem cells, biomaterials, micro-RNAs and bioengineering approaches
David Doorman dcdorman@ncsu.edu Pharmacology Toxicology, cognition and olfaction, and human risk assessments
Derek Foster dmfoster@ncsu.edu Pharmacology Antimicrobial resistance, food animal pharmacology, gastrointestinal physiology
Brian Gilger bgilger@ncsu.edu Pharmacology Ophthalmology
Duncan Lascelles dxlascel@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Phamacology Developing algometry methods in spontaneous disease animal models and probing tissues from animals with spontaneous disease to understand the neurobiology of that pain
Steven Marks slmarks@ncsu.edu Pharmacology
Chris McGahan mcmcgaha@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Phamacology Regulation of Fe metabolism in the eye, the involvement of Fe in cataract formation, mechanisms underlying post-surgical regrowth of lens tissue, uveitis, retinal physiology & pathology
Kristen Messenger kmmessen@ncsu.edu Pharmacology
Mark Papich mgpapich@ncsu.edu Pharmacology Disposition of antibiotics, antifungal drugs, anti-inflammatory drugs, gastrointestinal drugs, and analgesic drugs in a variety of animal species
Geof Smith gwsmith@ncsu.edu Pharmacology Pathophysiology and treatment of diseases affecting calves, ruminant pharmacology, food safety and prevention of drug residues
Micheal Stoskopf mkstosko@ncsu.edu Pharmacology, Population Medicine Environmental medicine applied to wildlife, health risk assessment, lipid biochemistry, paleoecology

Population Medicine

Graduate work in the Population Medicine Concentration Area includes research in epidemiology of a variety of species, medical geography, assessment of management practices on food animal production systems, production medicine for food industries, developing and monitoring systems for health and productivity, computer based record keeping systems, and development of applied statistical and analytic methods. Students selecting Population Medicine will focus on one or more of these areas.

A highly individualized curriculum of study is designed to meet the needs and interests of the student while satisfying selected requirements by the faculty. These include courses in epidemiology, statistics and other quantitative disciplines. Additional courses may be chosen by the student and his/her advisor from a large number of college and university offerings.

Courses Required for the Population Medicine Concentration

ST 512 Experimental Statistics for Biological Sciences II; Fall, Spring, & Summer (3 credits)

CBS 580 or UNC EPI 160 or UNC EPI 168 Clinical Veterinary Epidemiology (3 credits)

EPI 160 (UNC) Principles of Epidemiology

EPI 168 (UNC) Fundamentals of Epidemiology

CBS 650 Seminar in Pop Med & Vet Public Health (1 credit; minimum 3 credits total for doctoral students; minimum 2 credits total for master’s students)

CBS 754 Principles of Analytical Epidemiology; Spring (3 credits)

Other Courses from NC State

CBS 760: Molecular Technologies for Epidemiologic Investigation; Spring (3 credits)

CBS 780: Veterinary Production Epidemiology; Spring (2 credits)

ST 505: Applied Nonparametric Statistics; Fall (3 credits)

ST 506: Sampling Animal Populations; Fall (3 credits)

ST 520: Statistical Principles of Clinical Trials; Fall (3 credits)

ST 535: Statistical Methods for Quality and Productivity Improvement; Fall (3 credits)

ST 711: Design of Experiments; Fall (3 credits)

ST 715: Theory of Sampling Applied to Survey Design; Fall (3 credits)

ST 731: Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis; Spring (3 credits)

ST 733: Spatial Statistics; Spring (3 credits)

ST 732: Applied Longitudinal Data Analysis; Spring (3 credits)

ST 745: Analysis of Survival Data; Spring (3 credits)

ST 755: Advanced Analysis of Variance and Variance Components; Spring alternate odd years (3 credits)

ECG 741: Agricultural Production and Supply; Fall (3 credits)

ECG 748: Theory of International Trade; Spring (3 credits)

ECG 751: Econometrics Methods; Fall (3 credits)

ECG 765: Mathematical Methods for Economics; Fall (3 credits)

Courses taught at UNC School of Public Health Biostatistics or Epidemiology Depts.

Can be used as equivalents to many of the courses noted above.

231 Bayesian Statistics

256 Introduction to Nonparametric Statistics

257 Nonparametric Procedures in Biometric Research

259 Applied Time Series Analysis (3)

260 Advanced Probability and Statistical Inference I & (261) II

262 Generalized Linear Models or 263 Advanced Linear Models

264 Advanced Survey Sampling Methods

265 Linear Models in Categorical Data Analysis (3).

266 Advanced Linear Models

271 Demographic Techniques

280 Theory and Methods For Survival

Name Email Concentration Research Emphasis
Glen Almond gwalmond@ncsu.edu Population Medicine Swine Health & Production
Kevin Anderson klander4@ncsu.edu Population Medicine Bovine mastitis, detection of antimicrobial residues, improved therapy and diagnosis
Benjamin Callahan bcallah@ncsu.edu Population Medicine Ecology and evolution of microbial communities
Maria Correa correa@ncsu.edu Population Medicine Disease control and evaluation programs relating to food safety and zoonoses; rabies control
Derek Foster dmfoster@ncsu.edu Population Medicine Antimicrobial resistance, food animal pharmacology, gastrointestinal physiology
Tobias Kaeser tekaeser@ncsu.edu Immunology, Infectious Diseases, Population Medicine Swine immunology and large animal models
Suzanne Kennedy-Stoskopf skstosko@ncsu.edu Population Medicine
Cristina Lanzas clanzas@ncsu.edu Population Medicine Epidemiology and ecology of infectious diseases in animal and human populations
Jay Levine jflevine@ncsu.edu Population Medicine Aquatic animal epidemiology and ecosystem health, microbial communities, and environmental monitoring
Barbara Sherman blsherma@ncsu.edu Population Medicine Modulation of anxiety, fear, and aggression in companion animals
Michael Stoskopf mkstosko@ncsu.edu Pharmacology, Population Medicine Environmental and aquatic animal medicine
Andrew Stringer apstring@ncsu.edu Population Medicine Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR), Infectious Disease and Community Engagement
Sid Thakur sthakur@ncsu.edu Population Medicine Concentration Leader Molecular Epidemiology of Resistant Food Borne Pathogens

Admission Requirements

Students are accepted into the Comparative Biomedical Sciences program based on their academic records (GPA) as undergraduates and/or as veterinary or medical students, results of the GRE, letters of recommendation and expression of interest in comparative biomedical research. For the Ph.D. program, special consideration will be given to students who have had research experience (either an M.S. degree or other laboratory experience), especially in a biomedical discipline, or students who are completing strong clinical residency programs. To be considered for financial aid (a graduate assistantship), completed applications must be received by December 1st for fall admission. Including a Curriculum Vitae with your application materials is recommended.

  • Completed NCSU Graduate School On-Line Application
  • Meet all NCSU Graduate School Admission Requirements
  • Official transcripts to be uploaded with NCSU Graduate School Application
  • GRE scores to be uploaded with NCSU Graduate School Application (GRE requirement is waived for US applicants with a DVM/VMD degree)
  • Recommended Curriculum Vitae to be uploaded with NCSU Graduate School Application
  • Expression of interest in comparative biomedical research (Personal Statement)
  • Letters of Recommendation

To be admitted, a student should be a graduate of a major accredited biological science or medical science program. Students lacking appropriate courses may be considered for admission but will be required to make up certain undergraduate deficiencies without graduate credit.

Student Financial Support

Graduate assistantships are available to students in the Comparative Biomedical Sciences Program through the College of Veterinary Medicine, College of Sciences, affiliated departments, graduate training grants, and individual faculty members in the Comparative Biomedical Sciences program.  Doctoral students are given priority for College level graduate assistantships.

Questions?

CVM Coordinator of Graduate Programs and Research Training
Email: cvmgradprogram@ncsu.edu
Phone: (919) 513-6357

Dr. Samuel L. Jones, DVM, PhD
Director of Graduate Programs
Email: sam_jones@ncsu.edu
Phone: (919) 513-7722