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Degree Process

Before Your First Day

Make sure all of your transcripts are turned in to the Graduate School. The sooner this is completed, the better.

First Year – First Semester

Patent Agreement

You must submit your patent agreement before you complete your first semester. To do this please follow the steps below:

Go to MyPack Portal and click Main Menu -> Student Self Service -> Academic Records -> Graduate Plan of Work. Then click on the Patent Agreement tab and read the document before checking the box next to “I Agree.”

Rotations

Upon entrance into the CBS Graduate Program, the Director of the CBS Graduate Program will direct the graduate student’s program and act in the capacity of an adviser until the student selects a faculty mentor. Students are expected select a mentor as early as possible in their graduate training (preferably by the end of their first Fall semester). All first year students who have not selected an adviser upon entering the program should schedule ~3 laboratory rotations on a 6-8 week basis with faculty members of their choice who have lab openings. The objective of these rotations is to provide the student with an introduction to various technical aspects of biomedical research and to introduce the student to the research program, mentorship style, and lab culture of individual faculty members. Lab rotations are arranged by contacting and meeting with individual faculty members after consultation with the Director of Graduate Programs. If a student does not find a mentor at the competition of these three rotations, then they are allowed to add additional rotations during their second semester with permission from the Director of Graduate Programs.

First Year – Second Semester

Declaration of Thesis Advisor

Once a student selects a mentor, their mentor must fill out a Declaration of Thesis Advisor (DTA) form and have it signed by their department head. The form must then be submitted to the Coordinator of Graduate Programs. This form should be filled out whether or not the chair will be paying the students expenses. If the student is self-funded that should be notated on the form.

Formation of Committee

Once a mentor is chosen and a DTA form is submitted, the student and mentor should begin collaborating on the rest of the student’s graduate committee (completed during second semester/first summer). This committee will serve to direct, advise, and guide the student through the PhD program. PhD committees must be comprised of at least 4 members (3 total for Masters). You must have either 1 chair (thesis-advisor) or 2 co-chairs. Your mentor can qualify as a chair if they have graduated a student in the past. If not, they must have a co-chair who has. Your committee must have either 2 or 3 more members depending on whether you have a co-chair or not. These remaining members can consist of other members of NCSU faculty, a minor representative, if you plan to minor in something, or Inter-Institutional member from a qualifying university (Duke, Chapel Hill, etc.). Inter-Institutional members require approval by the Graduate School, which can be completed by filling out this form and submitting it to the Coordinator of Graduate Programs. You are also allowed to add faculty from other universities or people from industry. These members will not count toward your required 4 members. Members of graduate faculty from other universities are called External Members and are a voting member of your committee. People from industry are called Technical Consultants and are not voting members of your committee. These members must also get approval from the Graduate School, which can be done by filling out this form and submitting it to the Coordinator of Graduate Programs. You will be assigned a fifth member before your prelim called the Graduate School Representative (not for Masters). This person will only participate in your Prelim and Final exams. If you are assigned one before you submit your Prelim Exam request form to the Graduate School, please make sure to include them when scheduling your exam. You will also need to include them when scheduling your defense.

Once you have formed your committee, please put them into your Plan of Work in MyPack Portal (same location as your Patent Agreement).

First Committee Meeting

Once the committee is formed, students should schedule their first committee meeting (end of first year/beginning of second year). At the conclusion of this meeting, the student’s mentor should submit a Graduate Committee Report (GCR) form to the Coordinator of Graduate Programs and Director of Graduate Programs. These meetings will then occur yearly and a new GCR form should be submitted at the conclusion of each meeting. At the first meeting, the student and committee should finalize all of the courses the student should take for the duration of their degree. 72 credit hours for PhD students and 36 hours for MS students are required minimums.

Second Year

Plan of Work

At your first committee meeting, you finalize all of the courses you plan to take during your degree from start to finish. You must input 72 credit hours of these courses into your Plan of Work on MyPack Portal (36 for MS students). Please follow the Plan of Work guidelines. Once you input all of the courses, you should reach out to the Coordinator of Graduate Programs to review your Plan before you submit. After the Coordinator of Graduate Programs approves, you can submit. Over the next week or so, you should check back to see if your committee has approved your Plan. If they have trouble, contact the Coordinator of Graduate Programs for assistance. You will be assigned a Graduate School Representative by the Graduate School some point between when your Plan is submitted and your Prelim Exam. You can make updates to your Plan as needed after it is approved. Please consult the Coordinator of Graduate Programs before doing so.

Concentration

You should also submit a request to declare your concentration to the Coordinator of Graduate Programs before the end of your second year. Simply email a request to cvmgradprogram@ncsu.edu and your concentration will be updated. DO NOT assume your concentration has been declared. If you do not have one declared before you apply for graduation, the wrong concentration/no concentration will be listed on your diploma.

End of Second Year to Beginning of Fourth Year

Prelim Exam

Doctoral students are expected to take a comprehensive preliminary examination after the first year, and before the beginning of the third year (absolute deadline is within 4 years of degree). The student should schedule this examination at a convenient time after consulting with his/her advisor and advisory committee. This examination is intended to be comprehensive and assess the student’s preparations to be a scholar in the concentration area discipline.

The Request to Schedule form found on the Graduate School Forms page, must be filled out and submitted to the Coordinator of Graduate Programs at least two weeks before the proposed exam date. This form cannot be submitted until the written portion of the exam is passed.

The preliminary examination must consist of written and oral components. The written exam must consist of a research proposal and may also include written questions. The NIH NRSA individual fellowship application research plan component is the recommended format for the written examination grant proposal, but the committee can approve another format. The topic of the written examination research grant proposal is proposed by the student and approved by the graduate committee and should be related to (but not necessarily the same as) the thesis project. Students can propose to use a fellowship or research grant proposal planned for actual submission for the written examination research grant proposal. The committee must approve this and the topic of the grant must include independent ideas/hypotheses and aims developed by the student. The first draft of the fellowship or research grant proposal that is entirely the student’s work will be submitted to the committee as the prelim written examination research grant proposal. Grant proposals already submitted to the granting agency may not be used for the prelim written examination research grant proposal. The prelim written examination research grant proposal should be submitted at least one month and up to three months prior to the anticipated oral examination date. The thesis advisor is responsible for submitting the prelim grant to the advisory committee, setting a deadline for evaluation, and soliciting pass or fail grades from each committee member. The committee can provide the student with feedback on the grant proposal that the student will be expected to address in the oral examination. If the prelim grant proposal fails, the student should meet with the committee to discuss options for modifying the existing proposal or seeking a new topic.

The committee may also require a closed-book written exam consisting of a series of essay questions or problems based on previous coursework and research. Written questions generally take one day to complete. The committee should agree on the format and provide instructions to the student during the first committee meeting. The written questions exam should be completed by the student and submitted to the committee at least one month prior to the scheduled oral examination.

Satisfactory completion of the written examination is required before a candidate can sit for the oral preliminary examination. The oral examination is designed to determine the depth and breadth of the student’s knowledge in their concentration area and specific research discipline, to test the student’s ability to relate factual knowledge to specific circumstances, to use this knowledge with accuracy and promptness, and to formulate and test hypotheses based on current knowledge/data. Students are expected to prepare and deliver a short electronic presentation of their written grant proposal for the oral examination. Committee members will ask questions related to scientific background and content, hypothesis development, alternative approaches, and methodology. Committee members may (and generally will) ask questions to examine knowledge in the student’s area of research outside the scope of the written grant proposal. (Please refer to Comprehensive Examinations Guidelines for more information)

Last Semester of Program

Final Oral Examination

The final oral examination will take place after the dissertation is complete, except for minor revisions that the committee feels are necessary. The examination consists of a public presentation of the thesis research followed by a closed session during which the committee asks questions concerning methods and conclusions reached in the research and as reported in the dissertation.

The Request to Schedule form should be submitted at least two weeks in advance to the Coordinator of Graduate Programs, to schedule the final exam. The Permission to Proceed to Final Defense form must also be submitted approximately 3 months before the exam, after it is signed by each member of the student’s committee and the Director of Graduate Programs.

Thesis Submission

The thesis must be submitted within 5 working days of unconditional pass. The ETD editors will then work with students to make updates to the format of the document until the Final Error Free ETD Deadline. The thesis will then be routed to the committee for their final approval before graduation.

Apply for Graduation

Students must apply for graduation through MyPack Portal after they receive an unconditional pass on their exam. This must be done before the Apply to Graduate and Doctoral Graduation Attendance Notification Deadline listed on the ETD Webpage.

Annually

Annual Evaluations

Every year in January students will be prompted by the Coordinator to complete the GSOARS evaluation in MyPack Portal and submit their resumes to the Coordinator. At the same time, Committee Chairs will be prompted to complete annual evaluation forms for each of their graduate students. Students and chairs should meet during this period to discuss the student’s progress. After all evaluations are submitted, students are required to meet with Dr. Sam Jones to discuss their progress. The Coordinator will send out calendar appointment slots for students to choose from.

Committee report form

Students are required to provide a Graduate Committee Report (GCR) at their annual committee meetings for their mentors to fill out. The mentor must submit this form to the Coordinator of Graduate Programs and the Director of Graduate Programs at the conclusion of the meeting.

Concentration Areas and Requirements

Students in the program select from one of six concentration areas for their graduate research.

CBS Core Courses Required of all Students

CBS 565 Fundamentals of Comparative Biomedical Sciences (3 credits – Not required for students with DVM)

ST 511 Experimental Statistics for Biological Sciences (3 credits)

CBS 662 Responsible Conduct of Research (1 credit – Spring only)

CBS 800 Seminar series (1 credit; minimum 3 credits total for doctoral students; minimum 2 credits total for master’s students)

 Concentration Areas

Cell Biology

The Cell Biology Concentration Area encompasses research at the molecular and cellular levels in the following disciplines: gastroenterology, oncology, pulmonary biology, ophthalmology, reproductive endocrinology, pharmacology, neurophysiology and neuroanatomy, and cellular differentiation and morphogenesis. Research approaches employ a wide variety of molecular, biochemical, pharmacological, and microscopic techniques, utilizing cell culture and whole organisms. Students selecting Cell Biology will focus their research efforts on one or more of these areas.

A highly individualized curriculum of study is designed to meet the needs and interests of the student while satisfying selected requirements by the faculty. These include graduate level cell biology, biochemistry, and cell biology seminars. Additional courses may be chosen by the student and his/her advisor from a large number of college and university offerings.

Courses Required for the Cell Biology Concentration

GN701 Molecular Genetics (3 credits)

CBS 770 Cell Biology (4 credits)

CBS 810C Seminar in Cell Biology (1 credit; minimum 3 credits total for doctoral students; minimum 2 credits total for master’s students)

Other Courses

CBS 890 Doctoral Preliminary Exam (1 credit)

CBS 893 Doctoral Supervised Research (variable credit)

CBS 895 Doctoral Dissertation Research

CBS 896 Summer Dissertation Research (variable credit)

CBS 899 Doctoral Dissertation Preparation

Elective Courses

Elective courses are selected by the student and mentor, and must be approved by the student’s graduate advisory committee. Possible elective course include, but are not limited to, the following:

BCH 701 Macromolecular Structure

BCH 703 Macromolecular Synthesis and Regulation

BCH 705 Molecular Biology of the Cell

BIT 810 Biotechnology Core Technology

GN 701 Molecular Genetics

GN 702 Cellular and Developmental Genetics

GN 761 Advanced Molecular Biology of the Cell

GN 710 Eukaryotic Regulatory Mechanisms

GN 750 Developmental Genetics

GN/MB 758 Prokaryotic Molecular Genetics

GN/BCH 768 Nucleic Acids: Structure and Function

GS 735 Introduction to Genomic Science

CBS 770 Cell Biology

CBS 861 Bacterial Pathogenic Mechanisms

CBS/IMM/MB 783 Advanced Immunology

CBS/IMM 816 Advanced Topics in Immunology and Biotechnology

MB 718 Introductory Virology

MB/IMM 751 (Immunology; Spring)

IMM/TOX 705 Immunotoxicology

IMM 751 Immunology

IMM /PHY 756 Immunogenetics

PHY 702 Reproductive Physiology

PHY 503, 504 General Physiology I and II

PHY 513 Comparative Physiology

PHY 780 Mammalian Endocrinology

ST 701 Experimental Statistics II

TOX 501 General Toxicology

VMM 877 Clinical Laboratory & Necropsy

Concentration Area Leader:
Dr. Ken Adler
Phone: (919) 513-1348
Fax: (919) 515-4237
E-mail:ken_adler@ncsu.edu

Ken Adler
Interactions of airway epithelium with inflammatory mediators and inhaled pollutants
Title: Professor of Cell Biology
Phone: 919 513 6549
E-mail: kenneth_adler@ncsu.edu

Scott Bailey
Diseases of Pregnancy in the Mare
Title: Assistant Professor of Theriogenology
Phone: 919 513 6149
Email: scott_bailey@ncsu.edu

Anthony Blikslager
Mechanism of Intestinal Mucosal Repair
Title: Assistant Professor of Equine Surgery
Phone: 919 513 7725
E-mail: anthony_blikslager@ncsu.edu

James Bonner
Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Pulmonary Fibrosis
Title: Associate Professor of Toxicology
Phone: 919 515 8615
Email: james_bonner@ncsu.edu

Matthew Breen
Cytogentics of Cancer
Title: Associate Professor of Genetics
Phone: 919 513 1467
E-mail: matthew_breen@ncsu.edu

John Gadsby
Regulation of the Corpus Luteum
Title: Associate Professor of Physiology
Phone: 919 515 7224
Email: john_gadsby@ncsu.edu
Troy Ghashghaei
Development and Function of Adult Neural Stem Cells
Title: Assistant Professor of Neurobiology
Phone: 919 513 6174
Email: troy_ghashghaei@ncsu.edu

Brian Gilger
Pharmacology of the Eye
Title: Associate Professor of Ophthalmology
Phone: 919 513 6239
E-mail: brian_gilger@ncsu.edu

Jody Gookin
Host-pathogen Interactions in the Gut
Title: Associate Professor of Small Animal Internal Medicine
Phone: 919 513 6295
Email: jody_gookin@ncsu.edu

Marlene Hauck
Targeted Therapeutics in Cancer
Title: Associate Professor of Oncology
Phone: 919 513 8274
Email: marlene_hauck@ncsu.edu

Eleanor Hawkins
Respiratory medicine, particularly pulmonology and Chronic Bronchitis
Title: Professor of Small Animal Internal Medicine
Phone: 919 513 7727
E-mail: eleanor_hawkins@ncsu.edu

Paul Hess
Targeted Therapeutics of Immune-mediated Diseases
Title: Assistant Professor of Oncology
Phone: 919 513 6183
Email: paul_hess@ncsu.edu

Jonathan Horowitz
Regulation of mammalian cell cycle and transcription by tumor-suppressor genes
Title: Associate Professor of Cell Biology
Phone: 919 515 4479
E-mail: jon_horowitz@ncsu.edu
Web site: http://www4.ncsu.edu/~jmhorowi/horowitz_web/horowitzlab.htm

Samuel Jones
Regulation of Neutrophil Motility
Title: Assistant Professor of Equine Medicine
Phone: 919 513 6200
Email: sam_jones@ncsu.edu

B. Duncan X. Lascelles

Mechanism and Treatment of Pain
Title: Associate Professor of Small Animal Surgery
Phone: 919 513 6588
Email: duncan_lascelles@ncsu.edu

Chris Mariani
Biology of Cancers of the Brain
Title: Assistant Professor of Neurology
Phone: 919 513 0302
E-mail: chris_mariani@ncsu.edu

Nancy Monteiro-Riviere
Toxicity of environmental and novelpharmaceutical compounds
Title: Professor of Investigational Dermatology and Toxicology
Phone: 919 513 6426
E-mail: nancy_monteiro@ncsu.edu

Paul Mozdziak
Mechanisms of Skeletal Muscle Growth
Title: Professor of Poultry Medicine
Phone: 919 513 6248
FAX: 919 513 6464
Email: paul_mozdziak@ncsu.edu

Kate Meurs
Genomics of Cardiac Disease
Title: Professor of Cardiology and Associate Dean of Research & Graduate Studies
Phone: 919 513 6213
FAX: 919 513 6452
Email: kate_meurs@ncsu.edu

Nanette Nascone-Yoder
Development of the Gastrointestinal Tract
Title: Associate Professor of Development
Phone: 919 513 6229
E-mail: Nanette_Nascone-Yoder@ncsu.edu
Nascone-Yoder Lab Website: http://www4.ncsu.edu/~nmnascon/

Shila Nordone
Regulation of Inflammation
Title: Research Assistant Professor
Email: shila_nordone@ncsu.edu

Natasha Olby
Treatment of Spinal Cord Injury and Genomics of Neurological Diseases
Title: Professor of Neurology
Phone: 919 513 8286
E-mail: natasha_olby@ncsu.edu

Thierry Olivry
Pathogenesis and Therapy of Pruritis, Atopic Dermatitis and Autoimmune Diseases
Title: Professor of Dermatology
Phone: 919 513 7711
E-mail: thierry_olivry@ncsu.edu

Jorge Piedrahita
Role of Imprinted Genes in Embryo Development and Disease, Stem Cell Biology
Title: Professor of Genomics
Phone: 919 515 7407
E-mail: jorge_piedrahita@ncsu.edu

Marcelo Rodriguez-Puebla
Cell cycle regulation, skin carcinogenesis, mouse model, tumor biology
Title: Associate Professor of Carcinogenesis
Phone: 919 515 7409
E-mail: Marcelo_Rodriguez-Puebla@ncsu.edu

Korinn Saker
Nutrition of Cancer
Title: Associate Professor of Clinical Nutrition
Phone: 919 513 6871
E-mail: korinn_saker@ncsu.edu

Philip Sannes
Interactions between epithelial cell populations and connective tissue matrices
Title: Professor of Cell Biology and Histology
Phone: 919 513 6295
E-mail: philip_sannes@ncsu.edu

Lauren Schnabel
Stem Cell Biology and Immunology
Title: Assistant Professor
Phone: 919.515.7410
E-mail: lauren_schnabel@ncsu.edu

Robert Smart
Chemical carcinogenesis and development in model laboratory systems
Title: Professor of Toxicology
Phone: 919 515 7245
E-mail: rcsmart@unity.ncsu.edu
Web site: http://www.tox.ncsu.edu/faculty/smart/index.htm

Steve Suter
Genetics and Therapy of Cancer
Title: Assistant Professor of Oncology
Phone: 919 513 0813
Email: steven_suter@ncsu.edu

Don Thrall
Hyperthermia as a Cancer Treatment
Title: Professor of Radiology and Radiation Oncology
Phone: 919 513 6292
E-mail: don_thrall@ncsu.edu

David W Threadgill
Genetics of Inter-individual differences in health and disease
Title: Professor of Genetics
Phone: 919 515 2292
E-mail: threadgill@ncsu.edu

Jeffrey Yoder
Characterizations and Function of Innate Immune Response Genes
Title: Associate Professor of Innate Immunology
Phone: 919 515 7406
E-mail: Jeff_Yoder@ncsu.edu
Yoder Lab Web site: ~jayoder

Immunology

The Immunology concentration area coursework and laboratory research emphasize cellular and molecular biology studies in infectious disease immunology, mucosal immunity and inflammation, immunopathology, immunotoxicology, immunoparasitology, environmental immunology, and immunology of non-vertebrate species. The diversified faculty is drawn from the Colleges of Veterinary Medicine and Agriculture and Life Sciences as well as government agencies located in the Research Triangle Park. Interdepartmental cooperation provides a unique atmosphere for the study of immunology in a wide range of species.

The concentration is designed to prepare students for professional research and teaching careers in applying molecular biology techniques to animal and human health problems associated with environmental stress such as infectious agents and toxins. Immunology graduates are extremely competitive for positions in universities, pharmaceutical companies and governmental institutions. North Carolina State University in Raleigh with close proximity to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Duke University, and the Research Triangle Park provides a unique biomedical and research environment for seminars, meetings, and interaction with other scientists. Graduate research assistantships are available to qualified students.

Course offerings or research facilities are available in the following areas: immunopathology, immunotoxicology, immunoparasitology, mucosal immunology, molecular and infectious disease immunology, aquatic immunology. and environmental immunology.

Master’s Degree Requirements: Courses must include at least two 700-800-level immunology courses and one 500-700-level biochemistry course.

Doctoral Degree Requirements: Courses include at least two 700-800-level immunology courses, two 500-700-level biochemistry courses, and one 500-level course in statistics. Additional course offered by the Departments of Microbiology, Genetics, Toxicology and the graduate programs in Physiology and Comparative Biomedical Sciences may be taken. The remaining credit hours should include journal club (IMM 816), seminar (IMM 807) and research credits.

Courses Required for the Immunology Concentration

MB/IMM 751 Immunology (3 credits)

PO/IMM 757 Comparative Immunology (3 credits) or IMM/CBS 783Advanced Immunology (3 credits)

BCH 553 Biochemistry of Gene Expression (3 credits)

IMM/CBS 816 Advanced Topics in Immunology (1 credit; 8 credits required for doctoral students)

Other Courses

IMM/CBS 807 Seminar in Veterinary Microbiology/Immunology

Elective Courses

Elective courses are selected by the student and mentor, and must be approved by the student’s graduate advisory committee. Possible elective course include, but are not limited to, the following:

BCH 701 Macromolecular Structure

BCH 703 Macromolecular Synthesis and Regulation

BCH 705 Molecular Biology of the Cell

BIT 810 Biotechnology Core Technology

GN 701 Molecular Genetics

GN 702 Cellular and Developmental Genetics

GN 761 Advanced Molecular Biology of the Cell

GN 710 Eukaryotic Regulatory Mechanisms

GN 750 Developmental Genetics

GN/MB 758 Prokaryotic Molecular Genetics

GN/BCH 768 Nucleic Acids: Structure and Function

GS 735 Introduction to Genomic Science

CBS 770 Cell Biology

MB 535 Bacterial Pathogenesis

CBS 861 Bacterial Pathogenic Mechanisms

CBS/IMM/MB 783 Advanced Immunology

CBS/IMM 816 Advanced Topics in Immunology and Biotechnology

MB 718 Introductory Virology

ST 701 Experimental Statistics II

TOX 501 General Toxicology

Concentration Area Leader:
Dr. Scott Laster
Phone: (919) 515-7958
Fax: (919) 515-7867
E-mail:scott_laster@ncsu.edu

AdamBirkenheuer
General Internal Medicine and Infectious Disease
Title: Associate Professor
Phone: 919 513 8288
E-mail: adam_birkenheuer@ncsu.edu

Petra Bizikova
Veterinary Dermatology
Title: Assistant Professor of Dermatology
Phone: 919 515 7395
E-mail: petra_bizikova@ncsu.edu

Ed Breitschwerdt
Detection, characterization, and treatment of canine/feline bacterial pathogens
Title: Professor
Phone: 919 513 8277
E-mail: ed_breitschwerdt@ncsu.edu

Jonathan Fogle
Regulation of Immune Responses to Lentiviruses
Title: Assistant Professor of Immunology
Phone: 919 513 6248
E-mail: jonathan_fogle@ncsu.edu

Isabel Gimeno
Poultry Pathology and Immunology
Title: Associate Professor
Phone: 919 513 6852
E-mail: isabel_gimeno@ncsu.edu

Jody Gookin
Host-pathogen Interactions in the Gut
Title: Associate Professor of Small Animal Internal Medicine
Phone: 919 513 6295
E-mail: jody_gookin@ncsu.edu

Bruce Hammerberg
Allergic Disease
Title: Professor
Phone: 919 513 7712
E-mail: Bruce_Hammerberg@ncsu.edu

Edward Havell
The Innate Anti-bacterial Immune Response
Title: Professor of Immunology
Phone: 919 515 6184
E-mail: ed_havell@ncsu.edu

Paul Hess
Targeted Therapeutics of Immune-mediated Diseases
Title: Assistant Professor of Oncology
Phone: 919 513 6183
E-mail: paul_hess@ncsu.edu

Lola Hudson
Virus infection and Immune Mechanisms of the Brain
Title: Professor
Phone: 919 513 6306
E-mail: lola_hudson@ncsu.edu

Samuel Jones
Regulation of Neutrophil Motility
Title: Professor of Equine Medicine
Phone: 919 513 6200
E-mail: sam_jones@ncsu.edu

Matthew Koci
Avian Immunology
Title: Associate Professor
Phone: 919 515 2626
FAX:
E-mail: MDKoci@ncsu.edu

Scott Laster
Innate Immunity and Inflammation
Title: Professor
Phone: 919 515 7958
FAX: 919 515 7867
E-mail: scott_laster@ncsu.edu

Mike Levy
Immunoparasitology
Title: Professor
Phone: 919 513 8289
FAX: 919 515 3044
E-mail: Mike_Levy@ncsu.edu

Jennifer Miller
Bacterial Pathogenesis and Innate Immunity
Title: Assistant Professor of Microbiology
Phone: 919 515 7867
FAX: 919 515 7867
E-mail: jen_miller@ncsu.edu

Shila Nordone
Regulation of Inflammation
Title: Research Assistant Professor
E-mail: shila_nordone@ncsu.edu

Thierry Olivry
Pathogenesis and Therapy of Pruritis, Atopic Dermatitis and Autoimmune Diseases
Title: Professor of Dermatology
Phone: 919 513 7711
E-mail: thierry_olivry@ncsu.edu

Laura Ott
Inflammation and Biotechnology
Title: Teaching Scholar
Phone: 919 513 7685
E-mail: laura_ott@ncsu.edu

Lauren Schnabel
Stem cell biology and Immunology
Title: Assistant Professor
Phone: 919.515.7410
E-mail: lauren_schnabel@ncsu.edu

Frank Scholle
Viral Immunology
Title: Associate Professor
Phone: 919 513 7574
E-mail: frank_scholle@ncsu.edu

Michael Sikes
Lymphocyte development and differentiation
Title: Associate Professor
Phone: 919 513 0528
E-mail: mike_sikes@ncsu.edu

Steve Suter
Genetics and Therapy of Cancer
Title: Associate Professor of Oncology
Phone: 919 513 0813
E-mail: steven_suter@ncsu.edu

Mary Tompkins
Immunity to Feline Immunodeficiency Virus
Title: Director, Veterinary Clinical Immunology Laboratory
Phone: 919 513 6255
E-mail: mary_tompkins@ncsu.edu

Sue Tonkonogy
Immune regulation in the gastrointestinal tract
Title: Professor
Phone: 919 513 6252
E-mail: sue_tonkonogy@ncsu.edu

Shweta Trivedi
Veterinary Immunology
Title: Assistant Professor
Phone: 919 515 0266
E-mail: shweta_trivedi@ncsu.edu

Jeffrey Yoder
Characterizations and Function of Innate Immune Response Genes
Title: Associate Professor of Innate Immunology
Phone: 919 515 7406
FAX: 919 515 4237
E-mail: Jeff_Yoder@ncsu.edu
Yoder Lab Web site: ~jayoder

Infectious Diseases

Graduate work in the Infectious Disease Concentration Area includes research at the molecular and cellular level in bacteriology, parasitology, and virology, as well as investigations of the host immune response to these agents. Programs focus on etiology, pathogenesis, diagnostic development, vaccine development, and antimicrobial therapies. Programs also focus on gene regulation and host-pathogen interactions that influence pathogenesis. Research approaches employ a wide variety of molecular, biochemical, pharmacological, and microscopic techniques, utilizing cell culture and whole organisms. Students selecting Infectious Disease will focus on one or more of these areas.

A highly individualized curriculum of study is designed to meet the needs and interests of the student while satisfying selected requirements by the faculty. These include graduate level cell biology and biochemistry, as well as graduate level courses relating to the specific discipline chosen (bacteriology, parasitology, or virology). Additional courses may be chosen by the student and his/her advisor from a large number of college and university offerings.

Students entering the Ph.D. program having completed courses equivalent to the required courses may, with the consent of their thesis committee, petition the concentration area Graduate Committee to waive these requirements.

Courses Required for the Infectious Diseases Concentration

CBS 810 Seminar in Infectious Diseases (1 credit; minimum 3 credits total for doctoral students; minimum 2 credits total for master’s students)

Other Courses

CBS 890 Doctoral Preliminary Exam (1 credit)

CBS 893 Doctoral Supervised Research (variable credit)

CBS 895 Doctoral Dissertation Research

CBS 896 Summer Dissertation Research (variable credit)

CBS 899 Doctoral Dissertation Preparation

 Elective Courses

Elective courses are selected by the student and mentor, and must be approved by the student’s graduate advisory committee. Possible elective course include, but are not limited to, the following:

Biochemistry

BCH 701(Macromolecular Structure; Fall)

BCH 703 (Macromolecular Synthesis and Regulation; Fall)

Microbiology and Immunology

MB 703 (Microbial Diversity; Spring alternate years)

MB 714 (Microbial Metabolic Regulation; Fall)

MB 718 (Introductory Virology; Fall)

MB/IMM 751 (Immunology; Spring)

IMM/TOX 705 (Immunotoxicology; Spring)

IMM/CBS 755 (Immunoparasitology; Spring alternate years)

IMM/CBS/MB/PO 756 (Immunogenetics; Fall alternate years)

IMM/PO 757 (Avian Immunology; Fall alternate years)

IMM/CBS/MB 783 (Adv. Immunology; Fall alternate years)

IMM/CBS 816 (Adv. Top. in Immun. and Biotech.; Fall, Spring, Summer)

CBS 770 (Cell Biology; Fall)

CBS 771 (Vet. Med. Virology II; Fall alternate years)

CBS 774 (Epidemiol. of Inf. Dis. of International Importance; Fall alternate years)

CBS 861 ( Bacterial Pathogenic Mechanisms; Spring alternate years)

Molecular and Cell Biology

GN 701 (Molecular Genetics; Fall)

GN 702 (Cellular and Developmental Genetics; Spring)

GN 710 (Eukaryotic Regulatory Mechanisms; Spring alternate years)

GN 750 (Developmental Genetics; Spring alternate years)

GN/ST 756 (Computations Molecular Evolution; Fall alternate years)

GN/MB 758 (Prokaryotic Molecular Genetics; Spring)

GN/BCH 761 (Adv. Molecular Biology of the Cell; Spring alternate years)

GN/BCH 768 (Nucleic Acids: Structure and Function; Spring alternate years)

GN 810X (Special Topics: Genetics; Spring)

BCH 705 (Molecular Biology of the Cell; Spring)

Statistics

ST 501(Exp. Stats. for Biol. Sci. I; Fall & Spring)

ST 701 (Exp. Stats. for Biol. Sci. II; Fall & Spring)

GN/ST 770 (Statistical Concepts in Genetics; Spring alternate years)

Techniques

BIT 810 (Core Technologies In Molecular and Cellular Biology; Summer)

BIT 815 (Advanced Topics In Biotechnology; Summer)

MB 705 (Biological Scanning Electron Microscopy; Spring)

MB 710 (Biological Transmission Electron Microscopy; on demand)

CBS 732 (Electron Microscopy in Vet. Med.; Spring)

Concentration Area Leader:

Dr. Fred Fuller
Phone: (919) 515- 7396
Fax: (919) 515- 3044
E-mail: fred_fuller@ncsu.edu

Adam Birkenheuer
General Internal Medicine and Infectious Disease
Title: Associate Professor
Phone: 919 513 8288
E-mail: adam_birkenheuer@ncsu.edu

Petra Bizikova
Veterinary Dermatology
Title: Assistant Professor of Dermatology
Phone: 919 515 7395
E-mail: petra_bizikova@ncsu.edu

Ed Breitschwerdt
Detection, characterization, and treatment of canine/feline bacterial pathogens
Title: Professor
Phone: 919 513 8277
E-mail: ed_breitschwerdt@ncsu.edu

Jonathan Fogle
Regulation of Immune Responses to Lentiviruses
Title: Assistant Professor of Immunology
Phone: 919 513 6248
E-mail: jonathan_fogle@ncsu.edu

Isabel Gimeno
Poultry Pathology and Immunology
Title: Associate Professor
Phone: 919 513 6852
E-mail: isabel_gimeno@ncsu.edu

Jody Gookin
Host-pathogen Interactions in the Gut
Title: Associate Professor of Small Animal Internal Medicine
Phone: 919 513 6295
E-mail: jody_gookin@ncsu.edu

Bruce Hammerberg
Allergic Disease
Title: Professor
Phone: 919 513 7712
E-mail: Bruce_Hammerberg@ncsu.edu

Edward Havell
The Innate Anti-bacterial Immune Response
Title: Professor of Immunology
Phone: 919 515 6184
E-mail: ed_havell@ncsu.edu

Paul Hess
Targeted Therapeutics of Immune-mediated Diseases
Title: Assistant Professor of Oncology
Phone: 919 513 6183
E-mail: paul_hess@ncsu.edu

Lola Hudson
Virus infection and Immune Mechanisms of the Brain
Title: Professor
Phone: 919 513 6306
E-mail: lola_hudson@ncsu.edu

Samuel Jones
Regulation of Neutrophil Motility
Title: Professor of Equine Medicine
Phone: 919 513 6200
E-mail: sam_jones@ncsu.edu

Matthew Koci
Avian Immunology
Title: Associate Professor
Phone: 919 515 2626
FAX:
E-mail: MDKoci@ncsu.edu

Scott Laster
Innate Immunity and Inflammation
Title: Professor
Phone: 919 515 7958
FAX: 919 515 7867
E-mail: scott_laster@ncsu.edu

Mike Levy
Immunoparasitology
Title: Professor
Phone: 919 513 8289
FAX: 919 515 3044
E-mail: Mike_Levy@ncsu.edu

Jennifer Miller
Bacterial Pathogenesis and Innate Immunity
Title: Assistant Professor of Microbiology
Phone: 919 515 7867
FAX: 919 515 7867
E-mail: jen_miller@ncsu.edu

Shila Nordone
Regulation of Inflammation
Title: Research Assistant Professor
E-mail: shila_nordone@ncsu.edu

Thierry Olivry
Pathogenesis and Therapy of Pruritis, Atopic Dermatitis and Autoimmune Diseases
Title: Professor of Dermatology
Phone: 919 513 7711
E-mail: thierry_olivry@ncsu.edu

Laura Ott
Inflammation and Biotechnology
Title: Teaching Scholar
Phone: 919 513 7685
E-mail: laura_ott@ncsu.edu

Lauren Schnabel
Stem cell biology and Immunology
Title: Assistant Professor
Phone: 919.515.7410
E-mail: lauren_schnabel@ncsu.edu

Frank Scholle
Viral Immunology
Title: Associate Professor
Phone: 919 513 7574
E-mail: frank_scholle@ncsu.edu

Michael Sikes
Lymphocyte development and differentiation
Title: Associate Professor
Phone: 919 513 0528
E-mail: mike_sikes@ncsu.edu

Steve Suter
Genetics and Therapy of Cancer
Title: Associate Professor of Oncology
Phone: 919 513 0813
E-mail: steven_suter@ncsu.edu

Mary Tompkins
Immunity to Feline Immunodeficiency Virus
Title: Director, Veterinary Clinical Immunology Laboratory
Phone: 919 513 6255
E-mail: mary_tompkins@ncsu.edu

Sue Tonkonogy
Immune regulation in the gastrointestinal tract
Title: Professor
Phone: 919 513 6252
E-mail: sue_tonkonogy@ncsu.edu

Shweta Trivedi
Veterinary Immunology
Title: Assistant Professor
Phone: 919 515 0266
E-mail: shweta_trivedi@ncsu.edu

Jeffrey Yoder
Characterizations and Function of Innate Immune Response Genes
Title: Associate Professor of Innate Immunology
Phone: 919 515 7406
FAX: 919 515 4237
E-mail: Jeff_Yoder@ncsu.edu
Yoder Lab Web site: ~jayoder

Neurosciences

The Neurosciences Concentration at North Carolina State University is designed to prepare students for professional research and teaching careers in the area of neurobiology and to address animal and human health problems associated with the nervous system. Course work and laboratory research in the Neurosciences concentration emphasize studies on brain and behavior that span the range of molecular, cellular, tissue, and physiological aspects of the developing, adult, and aging central and peripheral nervous systems. Our faculty are spread across the university including the Colleges of Veterinary Medicine, Sciences, Engineering, and Agriculture and Life Sciences. Faculty are highly collaborative with expertise in developmental neurobiology, electrophysiology, neuroendocrinology, neurotoxicology, neurogenetics, and behavioral biology in both vertebrate and invertebrate model organisms. Ample collaborations exist with laboratories at UNC Chapel Hill, Duke, and agencies within the Research Triangle Park. As a land-grant university North Carolina State University provides a unique biomedical research environment, which is enhanced through seminars, symposia, and interactive workshops. Graduate research assistantships are available to qualified students who are successfully admitted to the CBS graduate program. Neurosciences graduates are well positioned to compete for positions in universities, pharmaceutical companies, and governmental institutions.

COURSES REQUIRED FOR THE PHD Neurosciences CONCENTRATION

  • CBS/BIO 705 Fundamentals of Neuroscience; Fall (3 credits)
  • CBS/BIO 805 Special Topics in Neuroscience; Spring (1 credit, minimum 3 credits total for doctoral students; minimum 2 credits total for master’s students)

ELECTIVE COURSES

Elective courses are selected by the student and mentor, and must be approved by the student’s graduate advisory committee. Possible elective course include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • BCH 701 Macromolecular Structure; Fall (3 credits)
  • BCH 703 Macromolecular Synthesis and Regulation; Fall (3 credits)
  • BCH 705 Molecular Biology of the Cell; Spring (3 credits)
  • CBS 770 Cell Biology; Spring (3 credits)
  • CBS/IMM/MB 783 Advanced Immunology; Fall alternate odd years (3 credits)
  • CBS/IMM 816 Advanced Topics In Immunology; Fall (1 credit)
  • GN 701 Molecular Genetics; Fall (3 credits)
  • GN 702 Cellular and Developmental Genetics; Spring (3 credits)
  • GN 750 Developmental Genetics; Spring alternate years (3 credits)
  • GN/MB 758 Microbial Genetics & Genomics; Spring (3 credits)
  • GN 761 Advanced Molecular Biology of the Cell; Spring alternate years (3 credits)
  • GN/BCH 768 Nucleic Acids: Structure and Function; Spring alternate years (3 credits)
  • MB 535 Bacterial Pathogenesis; Spring (3 credits)
  • MB 718 Introductory Virology; Fall alternate odd years (3 credits)
  • ST 701 Statistical Theory I; Fall (3 credits)
  • TOX 501 Principles of Toxicology; Spring (4 credits)

Name Email Concentrations Research Emphasis
Robert R.H. Anholt anholt@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Genetics; Toxicology & Environmental Health Sciences
Alper Bozkurt alper.bozkurt@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Bioelectronics Engineering (Including Bioinstrumentation, Biomechatronics, Biomimetic Systems)
Patricia A. Estes pat_estes@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Education and Public Outreach; Genetics; Integrative Physiology, Neuroscience & Behavior
Troy Ghashghaei troy_ghashghaei@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Concentration Leader Development and aging of the adult stem cells and their ependymal niche in the forebrain
John Godwin john_godwin@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Bioinformatics; Functional Genomics; Genetics; Integrative Physiology, Neuroscience & Behavior
He (Helen) Huang hhuang11@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Neural-machine interface, wearer-robot interaction, prosthetics and exoskeleton, human-machine symbiosis, rehabilitation engineering
Albert Keung ajkeung@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Synthetic Biology; Neural and Stem Cell Engineering, Bioengineering
David Lalush david_lalush@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Biomedical Imaging
Duncan Lascelles duncan_lascelles@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Neurosciences, Pharmacology Development of algometry methods in spontaneous disease animal models
Chris McGahan chris_mcgahan@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Neurosciences, Pharmacology Regulation of Fe metabolism in the eye, the involvement of Fe in cataract formation, mechanisms underlying post-surgical regrowth of lens tissue, uveitis, retinal physiology & pathology
John Meitzen jemeitze@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Integrative Physiology, Neuroscience & Behavior
Santosh Mishra skmishra@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying chronic itch and possibly pain in mice
Freya Mowat fmmowat@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Neurosciences Defining the underlying causes of SARDS in dogs
Karen Munana fmmowat@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Canine epilepsy- with focus on causes of refractory (poorly controlled) epilepsy and development of more effective treatments for dogs with seizures
Casey Nestor ccnestor@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Neuroendocrinology underlying the link between reproduction and energy homeostasis for puberty onset, steroid negative feedback, and food intake in sheep
Jun Ninomiya-Tsuji jun_tsuji@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Elucidation of the mechanisms of how TAK1 signaling regulates ROS and tissue homeostasis
Natasha Olby natasha_olby@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Neurosciences Understanding the genetic basis of hereditary neurodegenerative diseases and brain neoplasia
Thierry Olivry thierry_olivry@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases, Neurosciences Investigating the pathogenesis and therapy of itch and atopic dermatitis in dogs
Heather Patisaul hbpatisa@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) alter neuroendocrine pathways in the brain related to sex specific physiology and behavior
Emilie Rissman e_rissman@ncsu.edu Neurosciences How estrogens modulate sex differences in the brain and behavior
Sabrina Robertson sedought@ncsu.edu Cell Biology, Neurosciences Mapping the connections and functions of all neurons in the brain
Adriana San-Miguel asanmiguel@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Systems Biology, Microfluidics, Quantitative Biology, High-throughput Experimental Platforms
Coby Schal coby@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Urban Entomology, Insect Behavior, Chemical Ecology, Insect Physiology
Barbara Sherman barbara_sherman@ncsu.edu Neurosciences, Population Medicine Modulation of anxiety, fear, and aggression in companion animals
Leslie Sombers leslie_sombers@ncsu.edu Neurosciences Real-time electrochemical measurements of rapidly fluctuating small molecules in tissue

Pathology

Graduate work in the Pathology Concentration Area includes research at the molecular and cellular level in infectious disease pathogenesis, oncology, toxicology, hematology, and immunology. Research approaches employ a wide variety of molecular, biochemical, pharmacological, and microscopic techniques, utilizing cell culture and whole organisms. Students selecting Pathology will focus on one or more of these areas.

A highly individualized curriculum of study is designed to meet the needs and interests of the student while satisfying selected requirements by the faculty. These include courses in advanced systemic histopathology, toxicologic pathology, avian pathology, and seminar courses in clinical, necropsy, and surgical pathology. Additional courses may be chosen by the student and his/her advisor from a large number of college and university offerings. An appropriate level of competence in diagnostic pathology must be demonstrated by examination before completion of the graduate program.

Courses Required for the Pathology Concentration

CBS 795 General Pathology (3 credits)

CBS 810 Seminar in Pathology (1 credit; 3 credits total for doctoral students; minimum 2 credits total for master’s students)

Concentration Area Leader:
Dr. Mac Law
Phone: (919) 513- 7411
Fax: (919) 515- 4237
E-mail: mac_law@ncsu.edu

John Barnes
Infectious and non-infectious diseases of avian species
Title: Professor of Poultry Health Management, Pathology
Phone: 919 513 6273
E-mail: john_barnes@ncsu.edu

GARY A. BOORMAN

Title: Adjunct Associate Professor of Pathology
Phone: 1 888 268 2623
E-mail: gary.boorman@covance.com

LUKE BORST

Streptococcal pathogenesis and cancer metabolism
Title: Assistant Professor of Pathology
Phone: 919 513-8287
E-mail: luke_borst@ncsu.edu

John M. Cullen
Biology of hepadnavirus infections and hepadnavirus-induced liver disease
Title: Professor of Anatomic Pathology
Phone: 919 513 6350
E-mail: john_cullen@ncsu.edu

OSCAR FLETCHER

Avian histopathology
Title: Professor of Poultry Health Management
Phone: 919 513-6491
E-mail: oscar_fletcher@ncsu.edu

Marlene Hauck
Targeted therapeutics and hyperthermia clinical trials
Title: Associate Professor of Oncology
Phone: 919 513-6272
E-mail: marlene_hauck@ncsu.edu

DAVID HINTON

Environmental Toxicology
Title: Adjunct Assistant Professor
Phone: 919 613 8038
E-mail: dhinton@duke.edu

Jerry McHugh Law
Aquatic toxicologic pathology
Title: Assistant Professor of Pathology
Phone: 919 515 7411
E-mail: mac_law@ncsu.edu

Keith Linder
Keratinocyte mediated innate host resistance to skin infection
Title: Clinical Associate Professor of Pathology
Phone: 919 513 6257
E-mail: keith_linder@ncsu.edu

DAVID MALARKEY

Title: Adjunct Assistant Professor of Pathology
Phone: 919 541 1745
E-mail: david_malarkey@ncsu.edu

MARK SIMPSON

Title: Adjunct Professor
Phone: 301 435 7176
E-mail: ms43b@nih.gov

STEVE SUTER

Canine and feline lymphoma
Title: Assistant Professor of Oncology
Phone: 919 513-0813
E-mail: steve_suter@ncsu.edu

Pharmacology

Graduate work in the Pharmacology Concentration Area includes research at the molecular and cellular level in pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, drug residues and metabolites, anesthetics and autonomic drugs, pulmonary biology, oncology, ophthalmology, gastroenterology, reproductive endocrinology, and lipid-, peptide-, and oxygen-derived mediators of inflammation. Research approaches employ a wide variety of molecular, biochemical, pharmacological, and microscopic techniques, utilizing cell culture and whole organisms. Students selecting Pharmacology will focus on one or more of these areas.

A highly individualized curriculum of study is designed to meet the needs and interests of the student while satisfying selected requirements by the faculty. These include courses in introductory pharmacology and toxicology, advanced pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, statistics, and participation in a seminar series in pharmacology. Additional courses may be chosen by the student and his/her advisor from a large number of college and university offerings.

Courses Required for the Pharmacology Concentration

CBS 860 Instrumentation in Pharmacological Research (1 credit)

CBS 762 Principles in Pharmacology (3 credits)

CBS 787 Pharmacokinetics (3 credits)

TOX 710 Biochemical Toxicology (3 credits)

CBS 810 Seminar in Pharmacology (1 credit; minimum 3 credits total)

Elective Courses

Other elective courses are approved by the student’s advisory committee. Students requiring foundational courses are encouraged to consider TOX 501 General Toxicology and BCH 451/553 Biochemistry.

Concentration Area Leader:
Dr. Jennifer Davis
Phone: (919) 513-6720
Fax: (919) 515-6717
E-mail: jennifer_davis@ncsu.edu

Ronald Baynes
Title: Associate Professor
Phone: 919 513 6261
E-mail: ronald_baynes@ncsu.ed

James Bonner
Toxicology
Title: Associate Professor
Phone: 919 515 8615
Email: james_bonner@ncsu.edu

JENNIFER DAVIS

Title: Assistant Professor
Phone: 919 513 6720
E-mail: jennifer_davis@ncsu.edu

David Dorman
Title: Professor
Phone: 919 513 – 6237
E-mail: david_dorman@ncsu.edu

Lloyd Fleisher
Roles of cytokines in the initiation and resolution of intraocular inflammation
Title: Professor
Phone: 919 515 4481
E-mail: lloyd_fleisher@ncsu.edu

Brian Gilger
Ophthalmology
Title: Professor
Phone: 919 513 1273
E-mail: brian_gilger@ncsu.edu

TERESA LEAVENS

Title: Research Assistant Professor
Phone: 919 513 6446
E-mail: teresa_leavens@ncsu.edu

Steve Marks
Emergency and critical care medicine, general internal medicine, cardiopulmonary medicine and pain management
Title: Associate Professor
Phone: 919 513 6130
E-mail: steve_marks@ncsu.edu

Christine McGahan
Mechanisms of initiation and treatment of cataract formation
Title: Professor
Phone: 919 515 4482
E-mail: chris_mcgahan@ncsu.edu

Nancy Monteiro-Riviere
Toxicity of environmental and novelpharmaceutical compounds
Title: Professor
Phone: 919 513 6426
E-mail: nancy_monteiro@ncsu.edu

Mark Papich
Clinical pharmacology of drugs in animals
Title: Professor
Phone: 919 513 6221
E-mail: mark_papich@ncsu.edu

Jim Riviere
Quantitative mechanistic models of chemical absorption across skin
Title: Professor
Phone: 919 513 6305
E-mail: jim_riviere@ncsu.edu

Robert Smart
Chemical carcinogenesis and development in model laboratory systems
Title: Professor
Phone: 919 515 7245
E-mail: rcsmart@unity.ncsu.edu
Website: http://www.tox.ncsu.edu/faculty/smart/index.htm

GEOF SMITH

Ruminant Health and Production Medicine
Title: Associate Professor
Phone: 919 513 6288
E-mail: geoffrey_smith@ncsu.edu

Population Medicine

Graduate work in the Population Medicine Concentration Area includes research in epidemiology of a variety of species, medical geography, assessment of management practices on food animal production systems, production medicine for food industries, developing and monitoring systems for health and productivity, computer based record keeping systems, and development of applied statistical and analytic methods. Students selecting Population Medicine will focus on one or more of these areas.

A highly individualized curriculum of study is designed to meet the needs and interests of the student while satisfying selected requirements by the faculty. These include courses in epidemiology, statistics and other quantitative disciplines. Additional courses may be chosen by the student and his/her advisor from a large number of college and university offerings.

Courses Required for the Population Medicine Concentration

ST 512 Experimental statistics for biological sciences II (3 credits)

CBS 580 or UNC EPI 160 or UNC EPI 168 (3 credits)

CBS 580 Clinical Veterinary Epidemiology

EPI 160 Principles of Epidemiology

EPI 168 Fundamentals of Epidemiology

CBS 754 Principles of Analytical Epidemiology (3 credits)

VPH 650 Seminar in Pop Med & Vet Public Health (1 credit; minimum 3 credits total for doctoral students; minimum 2 credits total for master’s students)

Other Courses

CBS 890 Doctoral Preliminary Exam (1 credit)

CBS 893 Doctoral Supervised Research (variable credit)

CBS 895 Doctoral Dissertation Research

CBS 896 Summer Dissertation Research (variable credit)

CBS 899 Doctoral Dissertation Preparation

Other Courses from NC State

CBS760: Molecular Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases of Veterinary and Public Health Importance

CBS 780: Veterinary Production Epidemiology

ST 711: Design of experiments

ST 535: Statistical process control

ST 731: Applied multivariate statistical analysis

ST 505: Applied nonparametric statistics

ST 733: Applied spatial statistics

ST 732: Applied longitudinal data analysis

ST 520: Statistical principles of Clinical Trials and Epidemiology

ST 715: Theory of sampling applied to Survey Design

ST 506: Sampling animal populations

ST 745: Analysis of Survival Data

ST 755: Advanced analysis of variance and variance components

ECG 751: Econometrics

ECG 765 : Mathematical Methods for Economics

ECG 741: Agricultural Production and Supply

ECG 748: Theory of International Trade

Courses taught at UNC School of Public Health Biostatistics or Epidemiology Depts.

Can be used as equivalents to many of the courses noted above.

231 Bayesian Statistics

256 Introduction To Nonparametric Statistics

257 Nonparametric Procedures In Biometric Research

259 Applied Time Series Analysis (3)

260 Advanced Probability And Statistical Inference I & (261) II

262 Generalized Linear Models or

263 Advanced Linear Models

264 Advanced Survey Sampling Methods

265 Linear Models In Categorical Data Analysis (3).

266 Advanced Linear Models

271 Demographic Techniques

280 Theory And Methods For Survival

Concentration Area Leader:
Dr. Sid Thakur
Phone: (919) 513-0729
Fax: (919) 515-3044
E-mail:sthakur@ncsu.edu

Glen Almond
Swine Health & Production
Title: Professor
Phone: 919 513 6370
E-mail: glen_almond@ncsu.edu

Kevin Anderson
Bovine mastitis, detection of antimicrobial residues, improved therapy and diagnosis
Title: Professor
Phone: 919 513 6245
E-mail: kevin_anderson@ncsu.edu

Maria Correa
Disease control and evaluation programs relating to food safety and zoonoses; rabies control

Title: Associate Professor
Phone: 919 513 6253
E-mail: maria_correa@ncsu.edu

Lee-Ann Jaykus
Nucleic acid amplification techniques for detection of bacterial and viral foodborne pathogens

Title: Associate Professor
Phone: 919 515 2971
E-mail: leeann_jaykus@ncsu.edu

Suzanne Kennedy-Stoskopf
Title: Research Associate Professor
Phone: 919 515 8111
E-mail: suzanne_stoskopf@ncsu.edu

Jay Levine
Aquatic animal epidemiology and ecosystem health, microbial communities, and environmental monitoring.

Title: Professor of Epidemiology and Public Health
Phone: 919 513 6397

E-mail: jay_levine@ncsu.edu

David Ley
Pathophysiology of avian mycoplasma infections; development of diagnostics and vaccines
Title: Professor
Phone: 919 513 6269
E-mail: david_ley@ncsu.edu

Barbara Sherman
Title: Clinical Associate Professor
Phone: 919 513 6141
E-mail: barbara_sherman@ncsu.edu

Robert Sills
Title: Adjunct Associate Professor
Phone: 919 541 0180
E-mail: sills@niehs.nih.gov

Michael Stoskopf
Environmental and aquatic animal medicine

Title: Professor
Phone: 919 513 6279
E-mail: michael_stoskopf@ncsu.edu

Sid Thakur
Molecular Epidemiology of Resistant Food Borne Pathogens
Title: Assistant Professor
Phone: 919 513 0729
E-mail: sid_thakur@ncsu.edu

CBS Course List

CBS 493: Undergraduate Research in Biomedical Sciences (1-9 credits)

  • Course Leader(s): Dr. Kathryn Meurs
  • Semester: Fall/Spring/Summer
  • Schedule: Independent Study

Undergraduates participate in Research for credit in labs at the College of Veterinary Medicine. Please see Undergraduate Research for more details. : https://cvm.ncsu.edu/research/student-research-opportunities/#tabsPnl1-tab-1

CBS 565: Fundamentals of Biomedical Sciences (3 credits)

  • Course Leader(s): Dr. Jeff Yoder
  • Semester: Fall
  • Schedule: T/TH 3:30 – 4:45PM
  • Location: CVM Research Building, R101

Introductory course for students interested in gaining a broad understanding of: comparative genomics, comparative immunology, comparative physiology, pharmacokinetics, emerging zoonotic diseases, epidemiology and translational research models and methods. This course also provides an overview of current technologies relevant to comparative biomedical research and a foundation for implementing the scientific method (e.g. experimental design, data analyses, statistics). Priority will be given to first-year students in CBS graduate program; Enrollment of all students requires consent of instructor.

CBS 570: Methods in Biomedical Sciences (1 credit)

Introductory course for students interested in gaining a broad understanding of various laboratory methods used in molecular, cellular and “omics” based biomedical research.

CBS 595/795 – 001: Special Topics in General Pathology (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to the basic pathologic changes that occur in animal tissues. Inflammation, tissue injury, cancer and the resulting morphology observed at gross, cellular, and the subcellular level will be emphasized. The molecular mechanisms of these processes will be highlighted.

CBS 595/795 – 002: Special Topics in Avian Pathology (3 credits)

  • Course Leader(s): Dr. Luke Borst
  • Semester: Alternating Fall semesters (odd years)
  • Schedule: TBA
  • Location: CVM Main Building, B328

DVM students only or by permission of instructor. Changes in tissue from healthy and diseased birds, including poultry, companion, zoological, and free-living species will be covered by system and etiology. Emphasis will be on identification of lesions and their interpretation as a means of obtaining a diagnosis or studying fundamental aspects of avian health.

CBS 595 – 003 (for credit, 2)/CBS 810 -005 (pass/fail) Special Topics: Modeling in infectious disease dynamics

  • Course Leader(s): Dr. Cristina Lanzas
  • Semester: Spring
  • Schedule: M/W 1:30 – 2:45PM
  • Location: CVM Research Building R458

Mathematical models are an important tool for studying the emergence, transmission, and control of infectious diseases. The objective of this graduate course is to introduce mathematical modeling as a research tool to study infectious diseases. This is a highly interdisciplinary graduate course. In previous years, students with very different backgrounds and prior knowledge of mathematics and biology have taken the course.

CBS 595 – 004 (2 credits)/CBS 650 – 001 (1 credits) Special Topics: Population Medicine Forum

  • Course Leader(s): Dr. Peter Cowen
  • Semester: Fall/Spring
  • Schedule: M 12:15 – 1:15PM
  • Location: CVM Main Building, D236

Veterinary epidemiologists play an active role as public service practitioners in agencies tasked with ensuring public, animal, and ecosystem health. Population medicine forum is a seminar-based course designed to provide students with an opportunity to meet other public service professionals engaged in local, regional and global health initiatives. The seminar helps hone critical thinking skills and challenges students to consider the application of alternative approaches to the study of diseases in populations.

CBS 595 – 007: Epidemiology I (2 credits)

  • Course Leader(s): Dr. Maria Correa
  • Semester: Spring
  • Schedule: TH 2:30 – 4:30 PM
  • Location: CVM Research Building, R294

Epidemiology is considered the “cornerstone” of public health. The application of epidemiology methodology is taught in this course to study disease determinants among populations.  Data quality and assurance, critically review relevant published literature, and enhancement of oral and written communication skills, are part of the course.

CBS 595 – 008: Special Topics Wildlife Disease Ecology (2 credits)

CBS 624: Special Problems in Gastrointestinal Physiology (1 credit)

One credit for a 1-hour in depth discussion session of current journal articles presented by students on the subject of gastrointestinal physiology. Journals recommended include the American Journal of Physiology, Gut and Gastroenterology. Each session will focus on one student’s selected paper. MS students are expected to present 1 paper, and PhD students are expected to present up to 2 papers each semester. Students should be enrolled in a graduate course of study in a field related to or focused on physiology. Undergraduate students require special permission.

CBS 649/675: Issues in Preventive Medicine and Public Health (1 credit)

  • Course Leader(s): Dr. Peter Cowen
  • Semester: Fall
  • Schedule: M 12:15 – 1:15PM
  • Location: CVM Main Building, D236

Issues in Preventive Medicine and Public Health is a literature review course designed to assist students with their preparation for careers in public health, ecosystem health, biosecurity and public policy, disaster management, and application for Board Certification in the American College of Preventive Veterinary Medicine. Permission by course instructor required for enrollment.

Prerequisite: A prior degree in veterinary medicine or public health

CBS 662: Professional Conduct in Biomedical Research (1 credit)

  • Course Leader(s): Dr. Philip Sannes
  • Semester: Spring
  • Schedule: W 5:00 – 6:00PM
  • Location: CVM Research Building, R101

Plagiarism, authorship, fraud, safety, sexual harassment, IACUC, consulting agreements, serving as an expert witness, contacting elected officials, working with press, human subjects committee, and related topics.

CBS/BIO 705 Fundamentals of Neurosciences (3 credits)

This is a fundamental course that will provide the student with an up-to- date coverage of molecular, cellular, physiological, and circuit-based aspects of modern Neurosciences in the Comparative Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program.  Being a graduate-level class, the instructors will assume that the students have acquired some background in basic biology and biochemistry. The most important goal of this course is to train PhD students in neuroscience function and disorders, preparing them for neuroscience research. Emphasis will be placed on the systems and skills needed to pursue experimental neuroscience activities. Important components of the learning process will be presentations from neuroscience experts, class discussions, exams and in class activities.

CBS 711 – 001/CBS 810 – 004:  Theriogenology I: Applications in Reproductive Physiology (2 credits)

  • Course Leader(s):  Dr. Scott Bailey
  • Semester: Fall
  • Schedule: Alternating Wednesdays 5:15 – 7:15PM
  • Location: CVM Main Building Library A109

Students with advanced interests in Theriogenology will meet weekly to discuss a wide range of current topics surrounding animal reproduction, including comparative physiology and endocrinology, reproductive management, reproductive pharmacologic/technologic advances in Theriogenology. Each student will be expected to present 2-3 topics with typed, referenced notes and an oral presentation. All students will be expected to actively participate in group discussions and briefly present a review of one topic-related article from the past 5 years during each lecture.

CBS 712 – 001/CBS 810 – 004:  Theriogenology II: Reproductive Management and Disease in Domestic Animals (1 credits)

  • Course Leader(s):  Dr. Scott Bailey/Dr. Sara Lyle
  • Semester: Spring
  • Schedule: Alternating Wednesdays 5:15 – 7:15PM
  • Location: CVM Main Building Library A109

Students will meet every other week to review current literature and discuss a wide range of topics surrounding animal reproduction, focused on clinical causes of infertility and their treatments in domestic and non-domestic species. Students will explore 3-5 preassigned questions surrounding a particular topic and prepare an in-depth handout answering those questions prior to arrival. Each student will be expected to actively participate in group discussions

CBS 750 – 001: Techniques in Pharmacological Research

Theory and applications of modern scientific instrumentation to analysis of tissues, body fluids and drugs in pharmacological research. Discussion of appropriate aspects of the pharmacological use of spectroscopy, microscopy, chromatography, electrophoresis, radioisotope usage and centrifugation. Prerequisite: BCH 452B or CH 315 or Equivalent and Graduate standing

CBS 762: Principles of Pharmacology (3 credits)

  • Course Leader(s): Dr. Ronald Baynes
  • Semester: Spring
  • Schedule: T/TH 10:15 – 11:30AM
  • Location: CVM Main Building Library, A101

The action of drugs in animals and man including basic principles of drug disposition, pharmacokinetics, drug resistance, and signal transduction. Modification of physiological processes by drugs influencing nervous, renal, cardiovascular, and endocrine systems and the antimicrobic and antineoplastics agents.

CBS 764 – 001: Advances in Gastrointestinal Pathophysiology

  • Course Leader(s): Dr. Anthony Blikslager
  • Semester: Fall
  • Schedule: TH 8:05 – 9:20AM
  • Location: CVM Research Building, R101

This course will focus on advanced gastrointestinal physiology and the pathophysiology of diseases of relevance to scientists involved in animal-related research. A comparative approach will be presented for much of this material, using the dog, pig, horse, and cow as examples of carnivores, omnivores, herbivorous hindgut fermenters, and herbivorous foregut fermenters respectively when information is available. More importantly, specific topics that are considered to be on the cutting edge of gastrointestinal pathophysiologic research regardless of species will receive additional attention. The physiology portion will advance concepts presented in basic graduate physiology courses, and cover topics such as gastrointestinal motility, digestion, and mucosal transport. Pathophysiological topics, such as gastric ulceration, will be covered in conjunction with lectures on the specific region of the gastrointestinal tract being discussed.

CBS 770: Cell Biology (3 credits)

Advanced cell and organelle structure and function and recent advances in molecular biology. Emphasis on current literature and application of research procedures. Prerequisite: BCH 451 and BIO 183 and [CH 223 or CH 227]

CBS/IMM/MB 783: Advanced Immunology (3 credits)

In depth study of the basic cellular and molecular mechanisms of immunity, including antigen processing and presentation, T cell development, initiation of the immune response, effector mechanisms, and immunological memory. The course is designed for advanced graduate students who wish to focus on the current concepts in immunology.

Prerequisite: MB [IMM] 751

CBS 787: Pharmacokinetics (3 credits)

  • Course Leader(s): Dr. Ronald Baynes
  • Semester: Fall alternating years (odd years)
  • Schedule: TBA
  • Location: CVM Main Building, D330

Mathematical models to describe disposition of drugs and toxic chemicals in the animal body. Areas including classic compartmental and nonlinear models as well as physiological approaches. Discussion of application of these techniques to toxicologicstudies.

CBS 800: Comparative Biomedical Sciences Seminar (1 credit)

  • Course Leader(s): Dr. Samuel Jones
  • Semester: Fall
  • Schedule: W 4:00 – 5:00PM
  • Location: CVM Main Building, D236

Presentation and discussions on ongoing research and current topics in biomedical sciences.

CBS 803: Seminar in Surgical Pathology (1 credits)

Description and interpretation of microscopic changes in tissues from diseased domestic and laboratory animals. Students attend and participate in a one-hour weekly seminar where microscopic lesions described, interpreted and discussed. Prerequisite: Those holding the DVM or equivalent degree

CBS/BIO 805: Special Topics in Neurosciences (1 credit)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to integrate and apply knowledge and skills gained from their graduate studies. Emphasis will be placed on primary literature, laboratory visits and practices, and on effective, professional communication and presentations. Topics and instructors will vary from semester to semester. Priority will initially be given to graduate students participating in the neuroscience concentration; other students with the necessary prerequisites will be admitted on a space available basis.

CBS 810 – 001 Special Topics: Infectious Diseases Seminar

  • Course Leader(s): Dr. Fred Fuller
  • Semester: Spring
  • Schedule: W TBA
  • Location: CVM Research Building, R458

CBS 810 – 003 Special Topics: Comparative Medicine & Translational Research (1 credit)

  • Course Leader(s): Dr. Samuel Jones
  • Semester: Fall
  • Schedule: M 4:00 – 5:00PM
  • Location: CVM Research Building, R101

This seminar is a journal club covering high impact papers that use novel animal models and/or translational research approaches. Trainees learn to effectively present findings and conclusions from and critically evaluate published research. Part of the discussion is devoted the appropriate use of animal models of disease and how they impact discovery and translational research in the context of the paper being presented. Other topics included in the discussion are related to translational research, including areas of application, clinical evaluation of new discoveries, and the process of drug development from discovery to market including clinical trial design.

CBS 810 – 005 Special Topics: Grant Writing (1 credit)

  • Course Leader(s): Dr. Nanette Nascone-Yoder
  • Semester: Spring
  • Schedule: TH 10:30 – 11:20AM
  • Location: CVM Research Building, R256

CBS 810 – 007 Special Topics: Cell Biology Seminar

  • Course Leader(s): Dr. Philip Sannes
  • Semester: Spring
  • Schedule: TH 4:30 – 5:30PM
  • Location: CVM Research Building, R256

CBS 810 – 008 & 601 Special Topics: Zoological Health Literature Review (1 credit)

This course in an intensive review of the current and recent literature in zoological health focused on the ACZM reading recommendations. This course is designed for students studying for their specialty board examinations.  Students have monthly assignments reviewing assigned components of the literature and weekly take the assigned quizzes.  It is set up fully online with reading assignments and requirements to submit questions into a database from which quizzes are generated and taken.  There is no maximum number of students.  It is only useful for students preparing for ACZM or ECZM board examinations.

CBS 810 – 009 Special Topics: Pathology Seminar (1 credit)

  • Course Leader(s): Dr. John Cullen
  • Semester: Spring
  • Schedule: T 12:15 – 1:00PM
  • Location: CVM Research Building, R256

CBS 810 Fall – 010 Special Topics: Pain Journal Club (1 credit)

  • Course Leader(s): Dr. Duncan Lascelles
  • Semester: Fall
  • Schedule: W 2:00 – 4:00PM
  • Location: CVM Research Building, R101

CBS 810 – 011 Special Topics: Journal Club in Pharmacology (1 credit)

  • Course Leader(s): Dr. Mark Papich
  • Semester: Fall/Spring
  • Schedule: TBA
  • Location: TBA

This is a journal club activity.  Students take turns leading the discussion on an article or group of journal articles they have selected in the field of Pharmacology.

CBS/IMM 816 Advanced Topics in Immunology (1 credit)

Selected topics of current interest in immunology. A different topic will be covered each semester to focus on the most recent developments in the field.

CBS 817 Advanced Topics in Zoological Medicine I (2 credits)

Selected topics of current interest in clinical zoological medicine focused on marine mammals, fish, reptiles, amphibians, waterfowl, ratites, raptors and medical issues in free-ranging wildlife. Review of current clinical and basic science literature, student-lead discussion sessions and participation in faculty-lead discussions.

CBS 818 Advanced Topics in Zoological Medicine (2 credits)

This course provides breadth and depth of knowledge in zoological medicine to prepare Zoological Medicine residents to pass American College of Zoological Medicine [ACZM] boards. Veterinary students are exposed to more in depth information related to zoological medicine than covered in their core curriculum. Each Fall [CBS 817] and Spring [CBS 818] semesters, different aspects of zoological medicine are covered. Topics rotate every 3 years so that all major groups of animals within the sub-groups, avian, aquatic, herptile, wildlife, and zoo are addressed. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or enrollment in DVM curriculum

Policies and Procedures

Please see the Graduate School Handbook for policies concerning PhD and Master’s degree program procedures:

PhD Program

Master’s Program

Time Limits

Code of Conduct

CBS Policies

A. Grades

A student who fails (a grade of D or F) a core course will be dismissed from the CBS Graduate Program. All first year students who have less than a B grade in any of the CBS core courses or an overall average of less than 3.0 will be reviewed by the Graduate Studies Committee and Program Director. A student’s status in the program is based upon academic performance and reasonable progress in research. If a student is permitted to remain in the program, the form of remediation will be decided by the Graduate Studies Committee and the student’s adviser.

B. Research

The conduct and execution of the research problem will be the responsibility of the student’s adviser and his/her dissertation committee. The student is expected to make reasonable progress in their research, and to attend at least one national meeting as a student to present data from their research.

C. Graduate Student Representation

To ensure that Graduate Students have the opportunity to actively participate in their program of study, students will have elected representation on the CBS Graduate Studies Committee. This will be in the form of one student who is elected by the CBS graduate students. The term of service will be for two years. The student representative shall attend all Committee meetings and make contributions that serve student interests. It will be the responsibility of the student representative to disseminate information from the meetings and to raise issues on behalf of the students. First year students will not be eligible for election to the CBS Graduate Studies Committee. Election of the student representative will take place during the Spring semester, with the term of service beginning on the following July 1.