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Profile

Troy Ghashghaei, PhD

Associate Professor, Neurobiology

Contact:

troy_ghashghaei@ncsu.edu
Office: 919.513.6174
Lab: The Ghashghaei Labortory
Lab Phone: 919.513.6174
Lab Fax: 919.513.6465

I have a broad background in the field of neuroscience, with specific training and more recently independent expertise in developmental neurobiology. My graduate work at Boston University was focused on mapping prefrontal cortical circuits that allow this critical brain structure to communicate with emotional centers of the brain. I followed my Ph.D thesis with a very productive postdoctoral experience at UNC-Chapel Hill, with the first report of the role of Neuregulins and their tyrosine kinase receptors on adult neurogenesis and neuronal migration in the postnatal brain, and subsequent reports on related findings in high-impact journals. I established my own laboratory at NC State's College of Veterinary Medicine in 2006, where I have laid the groundwork for currently ongoing research in my laboratory. This required development of critical tools and research methods to assess the role of genes in development and function of neural stem cells. My laboratory has obtained a number of grants in support of our research efforts and my students and postdoctoral fellows have all obtained excellent positions following completion of their work here at NC State. The focus of our current research is on embryonic and postnatal epithelial lining of the brain and how it contributes to development in the embryo and homeostasis during adulthood and aging.
Affiliations
Society for Neuroscience
American Society for Cell Biology
International Society for Stem Cell Research
Biological Barriers, Genetics, Neurobiology, Regenerative Medicine
Projects in our laboratory are focused on developmental neurobiology:

1. Development and aging of the adult stem cells and their ependymal niche in the forebrain. We use mouse genetics in combination with molecular, biochemical, and cell biological approaches to address fundamental questions regarding the functional significance of ependymal cells during development and aging.

2. Role of cell cycle regulators in symmetric and asymmetric divisions of neural stem cells in the developing and postnatal brain. We use mouse genetics, biochemical assays, and state-of-the-art imaging tools to understand mechanisms that regulate the decision of neural stem cells to divide symmetrically or asymmetrical in the embryonic and postnatal stem cell niches.







  • (2016) TAK1 determines susceptibility to endoplasmic reticulum stress and leptin resistance in the hypothalamus.Sai K, Morioka S, Takaesu G, Muthusamy N, Ghashghaei HT, Hanafusa H, Matsumoto K, Ninomiya-Tsuji J. | J Cell Sci. 2016 May 1;129(9):1855-65. doi: 10.1242/jcs.180505. Epub 2016 Mar 16.
  • (2016) TransOmic analysis of forebrain sections in Sp2 conditional knockout embryonic mice using IR-MALDESI imaging of lipids and LC-MS/MS label-free proteomics.Loziuk P, Meier F, Johnson C, Ghashghaei HT, Muddiman DC. | Anal Bioanal Chem. 2016 May;408(13):3453-74. doi: 10.1007/s00216-016-9421-3. Epub 2016 Mar 4.
  • (2016) Neurotypic cell attachment and growth on III-nitride lateral polarity structuresBain LE, Kirste R, Johnson CA, Ghashghaei HT, Collazo R, Ivanisevic A | Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl. 58:1194-8
  • (2015) Muddiman D.C. Influence of Desorption Conditions on Analyte Sensitivity and Internal Energy in Discrete Tissue or Whole Body Imaging by IR-MALDESIRosen E.P., Bokhart M.T., Ghashghaei H.T. | J Am Soc Mass Spectrom PMID: 25840812 [Epub ahead of print]
  • (2015) Unique glycan signatures regulate adeno-associated viral tropism in the developing brainMurlidharan G., Corriher T., Ghashghaei H.T., Asokan A | J Virol pii: JVI.02951-14. [Epub ahead of print]
  • (2014) MARCKS-dependent mucin clearance and lipid metabolism in ependymal cells is required for maintenance of forebrain homeostasis during agingMuthusamy, N., L. Sommerville, A. Moeser, D. Stumpo, P. Sannes, K. Adler, P. Blackshear, J. Weimer, H.T. Ghashghaei | Aging Cell Oct; 14(5):764-73.
  • (2014) Transplantation of GABAergic Interneurons into the Neonatal Primary Visual Cortex Reduces Absence Seizures in Stargazer MiceHammad M., Schmidt S.L., Zhang X., Bray R., Frohlich F., Ghashghaei H.T. | Cereb Cortex [Epub ahead of print]
  • (2014) A Knock-in Foxj1CreERT2::GFP mouse for recombination in epithelial cells with motile ciliaMuthusamy N., Vijayakumar A., Cheng J., Ghashghaei H.T. | Genesis 52(4):350-8.
  • (2013) Neural development is dependent on the function of specificity protein 2 in cell cycle progressionLiang H., Xiao G., Yin H., Hippenmeyer S., Horowitz J.M., Ghashghaei H.T. | Development 140(3):552-61
  • (2013) Identification of neuronal loci involved with displays of affective aggression in NC900 miceNehrenberg D.L., Sheikh A., Ghashghaei H.T. | Brain Struct. Funct. 218(4):1033-49
  • (2012) A Nestin-cre transgenic mouse isinsufficient for recombination in early embryonic neural progenitors.Liang H., Hippenmeyer S., Ghashghaei H.T. | Biol Open. 1(12):1200-3.
  • (2011) Specification of a Foxj1-dependent lineage in the forebrain is required for embryonic-to-postnatal transition of neurogenesis in the olfactory bulbJacquet B.V., Muthusamy N., Sommerville L.J., Xiao G., Liang H., Zhang Y., Holtzman M.J., Ghashghaei H.T. | Journal of Neuroscience 31(25):9368-82
  • (2010) An organotypic slice assay for high-resolution time-lapse imaging of neuronal migration in the postnatal brainJacquet B.V., Ruckart P., Ghashghaei H.T. | J Vis Exp (46). pii: 2486. doi: 10.3791/2486
  • (2009) FoxJ1-dependent gene expression is required for differentiation of radial glia into ependymal cells and a subset of astrocytes in the postnatal brainJacquet B.V.,Salinas-Mondragon R., Liang H., Therit B., Buie J.D., Dykstra M., Campbell K., Ostrowski L.E., Brody S.L.,and Ghashghaei H.T. | Development 136, 4021-4031.
  • (2009) Analysis of neuronal proliferation, migration and differentiation in the postnatal brain using equine infectious anemia virus-based lentiviral vectorsJacquet B.V., Patel M., Iyengar M., Liang H., Therit B., Salinas-Mondragon R., Lai C., Olsen J.C., Anton E.S., Ghashghaei H.T. | Gene Therapy 16(8):1021-33
  • (2007) Radial glial dependent and independent dynamics of interneuronal migration in the developing cerebral cortexYokota, Y., Ghashghaei, H.T., Han, C., Watson, H., Campbell, K.J., Anton, E.S. | PLoS ONE 2(8): e794
  • (2007) Neuronal migration in the adult brain: are we there yet?Ghashghaei H.T., Lai C., and Anton E.S. | Nature Reviews Neuroscience 8(2):141-151
  • (2007)  Reinduction of ErbB2 in astrocytes promotes radial glial progenitor identity in adult cerebral cortexGhashghaei H.T., Weimer J.M., Schmid R.S., Yokota Y., McCarthy K.D., Popko B., Anton E.S. | Genes Dev 21(24): 3258-71
  • (2006)  The role of neuregulin-ErbB4 interactions on the proliferation and organization of cells in the subventricular zoneGhashghaei H.T., Weber J., Pevny L., Schmid R., Schwab M.H., Lloyd K.C., Eisenstat D.D., Lai C., Anton E.S. | Proceeding of the National Academy of Sciences 103(6): 1930-1935
  • (2004) Receptor tyrosine kinase ErbB4 modulates neuroblast migration and placement in the adult forebrainAnton E.S.*, Ghashghaei H.T.*, Weber J.L., McCann C., Fischer T.M., Cheung I.D., Gassmann M., Messing A., Klein R., Schwab M.H., Lloyd K.C.K., Lai C. | Nature Neuroscience 7(12): 1319-1328. *Authors contributed equally

Neural Transplant Reduces Absence Epilespsy Seizures in Mice

Stargazer mouse looks upward at transplanted GABAergic neuron (green) in its primary visual cortex. Art by Alice Harvey. New research from North Carolina State University pinpoints the areas of the cerebral cortex that are affected in mice with absence epilepsy and shows that transplanting embryonic neural cells into these areas can alleviate symptoms of the

CVM Neurobiologist Maps Areas of the Brain Associated with Affective Aggression in Mice

A North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine researcher has created a roadmap to areas of the brain associated with affective aggression in mice. This roadmap may be the first step toward finding therapies for humans suffering from affective aggression disorders that lead to impulsive violent acts. Affective aggression differs from defensive aggression or

Research Profile: Dr. Ghashghaei

Dr. Troy Ghashghaei, assistant professor of neurobiology, is a neuroscientist in the Department of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences at NC State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine and a member of the NC State Center for Comparative Medicine and Translational Research. Dr. Ghashghaei’s team focuses on discovering genes connected to new brain cell production, and identifying

CCMTR Researchers Identify Genetic Conductor Involved with New Brain Cell Production in Adults

A team of researchers in North Carolina State University’s Center for Comparative Medicine and Translational Research has discovered more about how a gene connected to the production of new brain cells in adults does its job. The findings could pave the way to new therapies for brain injury or disease. Most areas of the brain

Journal of Visualized Experiments Profiles CVM Research Technique

The Journal of Visualized Experiments (JOVE) published a procedure article by Dr. Troy Ghashghaei and research associate Benoit Jacquet titled,” An Organotypic Slice Assay for High-Resolution Time-Lapse Imaging of Neuronal Migration in the Postnatal Brain.” Read the abstract, access a PDF of the article, and view the video here. JOVE combines written protocols with videos