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Derek Foster

Associate Professor of Ruminant Medicine

DVM, PhD, DACVIM

CVM Main Building D252

Bio

Dr. Derek Foster is an Associate Professor of Ruminant Medicine in the Department of Population Health and Pathobiology at North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine. His research is focused on optimizing drug use in food animals in order to maximize efficacy, while minimizing the potential for antimicrobial resistance. This collaborative research involves developing novel methods to assess drug concentrations at the site of action including the intestine, airways, surgical sites, and in the mammary gland. Improved understanding of the drug concentrations at these sites will allow veterinarians to optimize drug therapy in the future, and better understand antimicrobial resistance. Additional interests include colostrum management and infectious diarrhea in calves.

Derek received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from NC State University College of Veterinary Medicine in 2004, and was an intern in Food Animal Medicine and Surgery at the Colorado State University College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Then, he returned to NC State for a residency in Large Animal Internal Medicine and a PhD in Gastrointestinal Physiology. He became boarded in Large Animal Internal Medicine in 2007 and completed his PhD in 2012. Dr. Foster was named the American Veterinary Medical Association Young Investigator of the year in 2011, and received the Pfizer Distinguished Veterinary Teaching Award in 2012.

AFFILIATIONS

American Association of Bovine Practitioners

CERTIFICATIONS

Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (Large Animal)
PhD in gastrointestinal physiology

Area(s) of Expertise

BIOLOGICAL BARRIERS, GASTROENTEROLOGY, GLOBAL HEALTH, INFECTIOUS DISEASES, PHARMACOLOGY
Antimicrobial resistance, food animal pharmacology, gastrointestinal physiology.

Publications

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Grants

Date: 01/01/21 - 12/31/23
Amount: $6,926.00
Funding Agencies: NC Cattlemen's Association

Fescue toxicosis is a serious reproductive/growth disease common in cattle grazing endophyte-infected tall fescue in the U.S., resulting in over $1 billion in economic loss to the U.S. beef industry. In North Carolina and neighboring states approximately 90% of the tall fescue, which is the predominant forage fed to beef cattle, contains the toxic endophyte thus chronically exposing livestock to fescue toxicosis. Specifically, ergot alkaloids compounds produced by this endophytic fungus (Epichloë coenophiala) within the tall fescue plant cause the disease in cattle. The symptoms of this multifaceted disease include vasoconstriction, amplified heat stress, suppressed animal performance, decreased hormone production, poor reproductive efficiency, retained winter hair coats, and hindered calf growth. In contrast to altering the forage systems, the focus of this research involves changing the genetic basis of cattle consuming the endophyte-infected tall fescue to select animals that are able to tolerate the ergot alkaloid toxins.

Date: 09/01/22 - 8/31/23
Amount: $810,000.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA)

The Food Animal Residue Avoidance Databank (FARAD) program is a chemical food safety program that has been in existence for almost 40 years. This has been a collaborative effort by scientists from five veterinary colleges at North Carolina State University, University of California Davis, University of Florida, Kansas State University, and Virginia Tech Virginia-Maryland. The goal of FARAD is to provide the most updated information resulting in the production of safe foods of animal origin through the prevention and mitigation of violative chemical (drug, pesticide, natural toxins, and environmental contaminant) residues. The program accomplishes this through its objectives which are to identify, extract, assemble, evaluate and distribute reviewed information about residue avoidance and mitigation to persons such as veterinarians, extension agents, and regulatory scientists involved in residue avoidance programs throughout the United States. Each of the FARAD centers has expertise for delivery of the required information which eliminates redundancies and allows for smooth collaboration of collective talents unique to the field of veterinary pharmacokinetics research and related database management. The primary role of FARAD at NCSU is to respond to residue cases in livestock from food animal veterinarians and extension specialist, develop a population pharmacokinetics (PopPK) – Responder interface that takes into account population variance while facilitating its use by FARAD responders on the front lines of residue cases, and to provide research support that attempts to validate estimated withdrawal intervals following extralabel drug use. The latter is the primary reason why FARAD is utilized in residue cases.

Date: 09/01/21 - 8/31/23
Amount: $810,000.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA)

The Food Animal Residue Avoidance Databank (FARAD) program is a chemical food safety program that has been in existence for more than 38 years. This has been a collaborative effort by scientists from five veterinary colleges at North Carolina State University, University of California Davis, University of Florida, Kansas State University, and Virginia Tech Virginia-Maryland. The goal of FARAD is to provide the most updated information resulting in the production of safe foods of animal origin through the prevention and mitigation of violative chemical (drug, pesticide, natural toxins, and environmental contaminant) residues. The program accomplishes this through its objectives which are to identify, extract, assemble, evaluate and distribute reviewed information about residue avoidance and mitigation to persons such as veterinarians, extension agents, and regulatory scientists involved in residue avoidance programs throughout the United States. Each of the FARAD centers has expertise for delivery of the required information which eliminates redundancies and allows for smooth collaboration of collective talents unique to the field of veterinary pharmacokinetics research and related database management. The primary role of FARAD at NCSU is to respond to residue cases in livestock from food animal veterinarians and extension specialist, develop a population pharmacokinetics (PopPK) – Responder interface that takes into account population variance while facilitating its use by FARAD responders on the front lines of residue cases, and to provide research support that attempts to validate estimated withdrawal intervals following extralabel drug use. The latter is the primary reason why FARAD is utilized in residue cases.

Date: 09/01/20 - 8/31/23
Amount: $810,000.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA)

The Food Animal Residue Avoidance Databank (FARAD) program is a chemical food safety program that has been in existence for more than 37 years. This has been a collaborative effort by scientists from five veterinary colleges at North Carolina State University, University of California Davis, University of Florida, Kansas State University, and Virginia Tech Virginia-Maryland. The goal of FARAD is to provide the most updated information resulting in the production of safe foods of animal origin through the prevention and mitigation of violative chemical (drug, pesticide, natural toxins, and environmental contaminant) residues. The program accomplishes this through its objectives which are to identify, extract, assemble, evaluate and distribute reviewed information about residue avoidance and mitigation to persons such as veterinarians, extension agents, and regulatory scientists involved in residue avoidance programs throughout the United States. Each of the FARAD centers has expertise for delivery of the required information which eliminates redundancies and allows for smooth collaboration of collective talents unique to the field of veterinary pharmacokinetics research and related database management. The primary role of FARAD at NCSU is to respond to residue cases in livestock from food animal veterinarians and extension specialist, develop a population pharmacokinetics (PopPK) – Responder interface that takes into account population variance while facilitating its use by FARAD responders on the front lines of residue cases, and to provide research support that attempts to validate estimated withdrawal intervals following extralabel drug use. The latter is the primary reason why FARAD is utilized in residue cases.

Date: 02/01/19 - 1/31/23
Amount: $299,999.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA)

The proposed program, a partnership between North Carolina State University (NCSU) and NC Agriculture and Technical State University (NC A&T) will address several of the strategies in the Educational Need Area. Specifically, we will utilize a series of externships prior to and during the early years of the DVM curriculum to improve the hands-on experience and problem solving skills of our students with an interest in food-animal veterinary medicine. Externships will provide practical training in animal agriculture and food-animal veterinary medicine. At the completion of the externships, students will present their findings in a formal meeting with faculty advisors, practitioners and farm managers. Then, the students will present their results at professional meetings. To strengthen leadership skills, students will complete a one-week leadership program at the Shelton Leadership Center, NCSU. To address the need for Global Engagement, the students will be strongly encouraged to participate in a 2 - 4 week externship in a foreign country. To evaluate the program, one CoPD will use modern program evaluation theory and measurement, and the project will begin with a logic model. The basic model consists of four facets: resources, activities, outputs and outcomes. We anticipate the project to generate six products, to support one faculty study leave, and to benefit over 100 students. It is expected that the program will continue with support from the colleges and allied industries.

Date: 01/01/21 - 12/31/22
Amount: $6,976.00
Funding Agencies: NC Cattlemen's Association

Fescue toxicosis is a serious reproductive/growth disease common in cattle grazing endophyte-infected tall fescue in the U.S., resulting in over $1 billion in economic loss to the U.S. beef industry. In North Carolina and neighboring states approximately 90% of the tall fescue, which is the predominant forage fed to beef cattle, contains the toxic endophyte thus chronically exposing livestock to fescue toxicosis. Specifically, ergot alkaloids compounds produced by this endophytic fungus (Epichloë coenophiala) within the tall fescue plant cause the disease in cattle. The symptoms of this multifaceted disease include vasoconstriction, amplified heat stress, suppressed animal performance, decreased hormone production, poor reproductive efficiency, retained winter hair coats, and hindered calf growth. In contrast to altering the forage systems, the focus of this research involves changing the genetic basis of cattle consuming the endophyte-infected tall fescue to select animals that are able to tolerate the ergot alkaloid toxins.

Date: 09/01/17 - 8/31/22
Amount: $240,430.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA)

The majority of underserved regions identified in the USDA VMLRP cannot support a food animal exclusive veterinarian, posing a significant risk to food safety through violative drug residues. Therefore, it is critical that we educate mixed animal, small animal and equine veterinarians on appropriate drug use and residue avoidance in food animals as these practitioners must be the primary resource for farms in underserved areas. To meet this need, we will leverage the resources of the Food Animal Residue Avoidance Databank (FARAD) to provide targeted outreach and education to these practitioners. This will include in person continuing education seminars on residue avoidance at national and regional conferences that cater to non-food animal practitioners. Futher, online training modules will broaden the impact of the training to reach veterinarians across the country. These efforts will expand the reach of FARAD, increasing the number of requests for assistance. To appropriately respond to this anticipated increase in demand, we will create a combined internship program in residue avoidance and food animal medicine. These interns will be prepared to enter rural practice or an advanced training program. During this yearlong training, they will assist with the outreach described above and respond to withdrawal requests from practitioners. The expected outcomes of this project include broadly educating rural non-food animal practitioners in residue avoidance to assist in underserved areas, supporting FARAD to respond to these practitioners' needs, and preparing a group of veterinarians to directly address the needs of rural areas through a collaborative internship program.

Date: 09/01/19 - 8/31/21
Amount: $830,000.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA)

Food Animal Residue Avoidance Databank (FARAD) is a chemical food safety program that has been in existence for more than 37 years. This has been a collaborative effort by scientists from four veterinary colleges at North Carolina State University, University of California Davis, University of Florida, Kansas State University, and recently Virginia Tech Virginia-Maryland in 2018-2019. The goal of FARAD is to provide the most updated information resulting in the production of safe foods of animal origin through the prevention and mitigation of violative chemical (drug, pesticide, natural toxins, and environmental contaminant) residues. The program accomplishes this through its objectives which are to identify, extract, assemble, evaluate and distribute reviewed information about residue avoidance and mitigation to persons such as veterinarians, extension agents, and regulatory scientists involved in residue avoidance programs throughout the United States. Each of the FARAD centers has expertise for delivery of the required information which eliminates redundancies and allows for smooth collaboration of collective talents unique to the field of veterinary pharmacokinetics research and related database management. The primary role of FARAD at NCSU is to respond to residue cases in livestock from food animal veterinarians and extension specialist, develop a population pharmacokinetics (PopPK) – Responder interface that takes into account population variance while facilitating its use by FARAD responders on the front lines of residue cases, and to provide research support that attempts to validate estimated withdrawal intervals following extralabel drug use. The latter is the primary reason FARAD is utilized in residue cases.

Date: 09/01/18 - 8/31/20
Amount: $830,000.00
Funding Agencies: US Dept. of Agriculture - National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA)

The Food Animal Residue Avoidance Databank (FARAD) program is a chemical food safety program that has been in existence for more than 30 years. This has been a collaborative effort by scientists from four veterinary colleges at North Carolina State University, University of California Davis, University of Florida, and Kansas State University with the addition of Virginia Tech Virginia-Maryland in 2018-2019 (subaward in 2017-2018). The goal of FARAD is to provide the most updated information resulting in the production of safe foods of animal origin through the prevention and mitigation of violative chemical (drug, pesticide, natural toxins, and environmental contaminant) residues. The program accomplishes this through its objectives which are to identify, extract, assemble, evaluate and distribute reviewed information about residue avoidance and mitigation to persons such as veterinarians, extension agents, and regulatory scientists involved in residue avoidance programs throughout the United States. Each of the FARAD centers has expertise for delivery of the required information which eliminates redundancies and allows for smooth collaboration of collective talents unique to the field of veterinary pharmacokinetics research and related database management. The primary role of FARAD at NCSU is to respond to residue cases in livestock from food animal veterinarians and extension specialist, develop a population pharmacokinetics (PopPK) – Responder interface that takes into account population variance while facilitating its use by FARAD responders on the front lines of residue cases, and to provide research support that attempts to validate estimated withdrawal intervals following extralabel drug use. The latter is the primary reason why FARAD is utilized in residue cases

Date: 01/01/18 - 12/31/18
Amount: $29,955.00
Funding Agencies: American Veterinary Medical Foundation

Treatment and control of mastitis are the largest driver of antimicrobial use in the US dairy industry. Yet, pharmacokinetic studies of these intramammary drugs are inherently limited by sparse sampling, as samples are only collected 2-3 times a day at the time of milking. This limits our ability to accurately predict efficacy of these drugs, and may lead to inappropriate or overuse in some cases. The objective of this proposal is to compare the pharmacokinetic parameters of ceftiofur, a commonly used intramammary antibiotic, determined from continuous sampling of the udder with traditional intermittent sampling. We will then correlate those findings with clearance of intramammary infections and milk withdrawal time. Using an ultrafiltration method previously developed in our lab, we will continuously sample both healthy and naturally infected quarters to demonstrate the impact of disease on these parameters. Our hypothesis is that pharmacokinetic modeling based on continuous sampling of the udder will better predict treatment outcome and withdrawal times than intermittent sampling at the time of milking. We also expect to have higher concentrations in the infected quarters compared to healthy quarters. These findings will validate our method of continuous sampling of the udder, and provide the basis for future studies to properly associate pharmacokinetic parameters with clinical cures to better define prudent intramammary antimicrobial therapy while preventing drug residues in the milk.


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