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Liara Gonzalez, DVM, PhD, DACVS

Assistant Professor, Gastroenterology and Equine Surgery

Contact:

lmgonza4@ncsu.edu
Office: 919.513.6919
Lab: Intestinal Regenerative Medicine
Lab Phone: 919.513.6919

Dr. Gonzalez is a veterinarian, specialty trained in large animal surgery, with a clinical and research focus on intestinal disease. Dr. Gonzalez’ research has aimed to develop and utilize large animal models to translate lab bench findings into clinically relevant therapeutic interventions that benefit both human and veterinary patients. She is particularly interested in identifying improved means to determine tissue viability following severe intestinal injury as well as studying the role of intestinal stem cells in modulating mucosal barrier repair following ischemic damage. Much of her research, to date, has developed the techniques necessary to utilize porcine tissue for the study of intestinal stem cells that includes porcine crypt isolation and 3D culture. Dr. Gonzalez hopes to apply her knowledge and expertise in advanced laboratory techniques to solve clinically significant problems and further elucidate therapeutic targets to ultimately improve patient survival. Outside of work, Dr. Gonzalez enjoys, trail running, ride and tie (rideandtie.org), CrossFit, and travel.

Learn more about Dr. Gonzalez:

Biological Barriers, Gastroenterology
Intestinal disease is severely debilitating to both veterinary and human patients. In horses, colic is the leading known cause of death. Additionally, gastrointestinal diseases affect approximately 60 to 70 million Americans annually. One of the most dangerous forms of intestinal disease that afflicts both humans and animals is intestinal ischemia and reperfusion injury, which result in a lack of blood flow to the intestine.

In the face of no new therapies for treatment of intestinal ischemia in
decades, intestinal stem cells have been heralded as the greatest
potential therapeutic because of their tremendous capacity for proliferation and mucosal repair. Intensive study is underway to understand and harness the therapeutic potential of intestinal stem cells. NC State is leading the way in the field of large animal intestinal stem cells and novel stem cell-driven structures called enteroids, or “mini guts.”
  • (2016) The key to translational discovery in digestive disease.Ziegler A, Gonzalez LM, Blikslager AT. |
  • (2016) Book Chapter: Intestinal Stem Cells.Gonzalez LM. | In: Blikslager AT, White NA, Moore JN, Mair TS, Eds., Equine Acute Abdomen, 3rd Edition. Wiley & Sons, Inc. Hoboken, NJ, 2016
  • (2016) Book Chapter: Intestinal Viability.Gonzalez LM. | In: Blikslager AT, White NA, Moore JN, Mair TS, Eds., Equine Acute Abdomen, 3rd Edition. Wiley & Sons, Inc. Hoboken, NJ, 2016
  • (2016) An evaluation of the psychometric properties of an advising survey for medical and professional program students.Royal KD, Gonzalez LM. | Journal of Educational Developmental Psychology 2016;6(1).Epub
  • (2015) The mother of a gut cell: Intestinal epithelial stem cells. Gonzalez LM, | Equine Vet Educ. Invited editorial 2015;27(11)559-560.
  • (2015) Porcine models of digestive disease: the future of large animal translational research. Gonzalez LM, Moeser AJ, Blikslager AT. | Translational Research 2015;166(1)12-27. PMID:25655839.
  • (2015) Characterization of Discrete Equine Intestinal Epithelial Cell Lineages.Gonzalez LM, Kinnin LS, Blikslager AT. | Am J Vet Res 2015;76(4)358-66. PMID:25815577
  • (2015) Animal models of ischemia-reperfusion induced intestinal injury: progress and promise for translational research.Gonzalez LM, Moeser AJ, Blikslager AT. | Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 2015;308(2)G63-75. PMID:25414098.
  • (2015) Operative Factors Associated with Short-term Survival in Horses with Large Colon Volvulus: 47 cases from 2006 to 2013.Gonzalez LM, Fogle CF, Baker WT, Hughes FE, Law JM, Motsinger-Reif AA, Blikslager AT. | Equine Vet J 2015;47(3)279-84. PMID:24735170.
  • (2013) Development of a porcine model to study stem cell driven regeneration of the intestinal epithelium. Gonzalez LM, Williamson I, Piedrahita JA, Blikslager AT, Magness ST. | PLoS ONE 2013;8(6):e66465. PMID:23840480.
  • (2010) Magnetic resonance imaging of metacarpo(tarso) phalangeal region.Gonzalez LM, Schramme MC, Redding WR, Robertson ID, Thrall DE. | Vet Radiol Ultrasound 2010;51:404-414. PMID:20806872.