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Craig Harms, DVM, PhD, Diplomate (ACZM)

Professor, Aquatics, Wildlife, & Zoo Medicine
Director, Marine Health Program (CMAST)

Contact:

caharms@ncsu.edu
Office: 252.222.6339
Center: Center for Marine Sciences and Technology
Center: Environmental Medical Consortium

Dr. Harms directs the Marine Health Program at CMAST, and conducts clinically applied research on health and diseases of aquatic and nondomestic species in the course of delivering veterinary services and support at the NC Aquariums, the Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Center, marine mammal and sea turtle stranding networks, area research aquaculture facilities, and our Morehead City/Beaufort area marine laboratories.

Recent work has included identification of novel and emerging aquatic animal pathogens, meeting unique anesthetic challenges for in-water sensory biology research, assessing and mitigating physiologic impact of capture techniques for wildlife research, welfare concerns for stranded large whales, and pharmacokinetics in nondomestic species.

Dr. Harms received his DVM from Iowa State University in 1989, and his PhD in Immunology from NC State University in 1999.
Affiliations
Internship in Zoo, Exotic and Wildlife Medicine, Kansas State University
Residency in Zoological Medicine, North Carolina State University
Certifications
Diplomate, American College of Zoological Medicine
Spontaneous Animal Disease Models
Dr. Harms conducts clinically applied research on health and diseases of aquatic and nondomestic species in the course of delivering veterinary services and support at the NC Aquariums, the Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Center, marine mammal and sea turtle stranding networks, area research aquaculture facilities, and our Morehead City/Beaufort area marine laboratories.

Recent work has included identification of novel and emerging aquatic animal pathogens, meeting unique anesthetic challenges for in-water sensory biology research, assessing and mitigating physiologic impact of capture techniques for wildlife research, welfare concerns for stranded large whales, and pharmacokinetics in nondomestic species.